Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Orbital period

+ Save concept

The orbital period is the time a given astronomical object takes to complete one orbit around another object, and applies in astronomy usually to planets or asteroids orbiting the Sun, moons orbiting planets, exoplanets orbiting other stars, or binary stars. [1]

73 relations: Alpha Centauri, AM Canum Venaticorum, Apsis, Asteroid, Astrometry, Astronomical object, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Barycenter, Beta Lyrae, Binary star, Celestial mechanics, Celestial sphere, Center of mass, Ceres (dwarf planet), Conjunction (astronomy), Deimos (moon), Earth, Ecliptic, Elliptic orbit, Epoch (astronomy), Eris (dwarf planet), Exoplanet, Fixed stars, Frame of reference, General relativity, Geostationary orbit, Gravitational constant, Hour, Julian year (astronomy), Jupiter, Kepler's laws of planetary motion, Kilogram, List of periodic comets, Mars, Mercury (planet), Metre, Moon, Natural satellite, Near-Earth object, Neptune, Nodal period, Opposition (planets), Orbit, Orbital node, Orbital resonance, Perihelion and aphelion, Periodic function, Perturbation (astronomy), Planet, ..., Pluto, Precession, Proxima Centauri, Right ascension, Rotation period, Saturn, Semi-major and semi-minor axes, Sidereal time, Sidereal year, Solar System, Solar time, Standard gravitational parameter, Star, Sun, Time standard, Uranus, Venus, 10 Hygiea, 2060 Chiron, 4 Vesta, 50000 Quaoar, 90377 Sedna, 99942 Apophis. Expand index (23 more) »

Alpha Centauri

Alpha Centauri (α Centauri, abbreviated Alf Cen or α Cen) is the star system closest to the Solar System, being from the Sun.

New!!: Orbital period and Alpha Centauri · See more »

AM Canum Venaticorum

AM Canum Venaticorum is a cataclysmic variable binary star in the constellation of Canes Venatici.

New!!: Orbital period and AM Canum Venaticorum · See more »

Apsis

An apsis (ἁψίς; plural apsides, Greek: ἁψῖδες) is an extreme point in the orbit of an object.

New!!: Orbital period and Apsis · See more »

Asteroid

Asteroids are minor planets, especially those of the inner Solar System.

New!!: Orbital period and Asteroid · See more »

Astrometry

Astrometry is the branch of astronomy that involves precise measurements of the positions and movements of stars and other celestial bodies.

New!!: Orbital period and Astrometry · See more »

Astronomical object

An astronomical object or celestial object is a naturally occurring physical entity, association, or structure that exists in the observable universe.

New!!: Orbital period and Astronomical object · See more »

Astronomy

Astronomy (from ἀστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena.

New!!: Orbital period and Astronomy · See more »

Astrophysics

Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that employs the principles of physics and chemistry "to ascertain the nature of the astronomical objects, rather than their positions or motions in space".

New!!: Orbital period and Astrophysics · See more »

Barycenter

The barycenter (or barycentre; from the Ancient Greek βαρύς heavy + κέντρον centre) is the center of mass of two or more bodies that are orbiting each other, which is the point around which they both orbit.

New!!: Orbital period and Barycenter · See more »

Beta Lyrae

Beta Lyrae (Latinized from β Lyrae, abbreviated Beta Lyr, β Lyr), also named Sheliak, is a binary star system approximately from the Sun in the constellation of Lyra.

New!!: Orbital period and Beta Lyrae · See more »

Binary star

A binary star is a star system consisting of two stars orbiting around their common barycenter.

New!!: Orbital period and Binary star · See more »

Celestial mechanics

Celestial mechanics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the motions of celestial objects.

New!!: Orbital period and Celestial mechanics · See more »

Celestial sphere

In astronomy and navigation, the celestial sphere is an abstract sphere with an arbitrarily large radius concentric to Earth.

New!!: Orbital period and Celestial sphere · See more »

Center of mass

In physics, the center of mass of a distribution of mass in space is the unique point where the weighted relative position of the distributed mass sums to zero, or the point where if a force is applied it moves in the direction of the force without rotating.

New!!: Orbital period and Center of mass · See more »

Ceres (dwarf planet)

Ceres (minor-planet designation: 1 Ceres) is the largest object in the asteroid belt that lies between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, slightly closer to Mars' orbit.

New!!: Orbital period and Ceres (dwarf planet) · See more »

Conjunction (astronomy)

In astronomy, a conjunction occurs when two astronomical objects or spacecraft have either the same right ascension or the same ecliptic longitude, usually as observed from Earth.

New!!: Orbital period and Conjunction (astronomy) · See more »

Deimos (moon)

Deimos (systematic designation: Mars II) is the smaller and outer of the two natural satellites of the planet Mars, the other being Phobos.

New!!: Orbital period and Deimos (moon) · See more »

Earth

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

New!!: Orbital period and Earth · See more »

Ecliptic

The ecliptic is the circular path on the celestial sphere that the Sun follows over the course of a year; it is the basis of the ecliptic coordinate system.

New!!: Orbital period and Ecliptic · See more »

Elliptic orbit

In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics, an elliptic orbit or elliptical orbit is a Kepler orbit with an eccentricity of less than 1; this includes the special case of a circular orbit, with eccentricity equal to 0.

New!!: Orbital period and Elliptic orbit · See more »

Epoch (astronomy)

In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time used as a reference point for some time-varying astronomical quantity, such as the celestial coordinates or elliptical orbital elements of a celestial body, because these are subject to perturbations and vary with time.

New!!: Orbital period and Epoch (astronomy) · See more »

Eris (dwarf planet)

Eris (minor-planet designation 136199 Eris) is the most massive and second-largest (by volume) dwarf planet in the known Solar System.

New!!: Orbital period and Eris (dwarf planet) · See more »

Exoplanet

An exoplanet or extrasolar planet is a planet outside our solar system.

New!!: Orbital period and Exoplanet · See more »

Fixed stars

The fixed stars (stellae fixae) comprise the background of astronomical objects that appear to not move relative to each other in the night sky compared to the foreground of Solar System objects that do.

New!!: Orbital period and Fixed stars · See more »

Frame of reference

In physics, a frame of reference (or reference frame) consists of an abstract coordinate system and the set of physical reference points that uniquely fix (locate and orient) the coordinate system and standardize measurements.

New!!: Orbital period and Frame of reference · See more »

General relativity

General relativity (GR, also known as the general theory of relativity or GTR) is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915 and the current description of gravitation in modern physics.

New!!: Orbital period and General relativity · See more »

Geostationary orbit

A geostationary orbit, often referred to as a geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), is a circular geosynchronous orbit above Earth's equator and following the direction of Earth's rotation.

New!!: Orbital period and Geostationary orbit · See more »

Gravitational constant

The gravitational constant (also known as the "universal gravitational constant", the "Newtonian constant of gravitation", or the "Cavendish gravitational constant"), denoted by the letter, is an empirical physical constant involved in the calculation of gravitational effects in Sir Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation and in Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.

New!!: Orbital period and Gravitational constant · See more »

Hour

An hour (symbol: h; also abbreviated hr.) is a unit of time conventionally reckoned as of a day and scientifically reckoned as 3,599–3,601 seconds, depending on conditions.

New!!: Orbital period and Hour · See more »

Julian year (astronomy)

In astronomy, a Julian year (symbol: a) is a unit of measurement of time defined as exactly 365.25 days of SI seconds each.

New!!: Orbital period and Julian year (astronomy) · See more »

Jupiter

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest in the Solar System.

New!!: Orbital period and Jupiter · See more »

Kepler's laws of planetary motion

In astronomy, Kepler's laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

New!!: Orbital period and Kepler's laws of planetary motion · See more »

Kilogram

The kilogram or kilogramme (symbol: kg) is the base unit of mass in the International System of Units (SI), and is defined as being equal to the mass of the International Prototype of the Kilogram (IPK, also known as "Le Grand K" or "Big K"), a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy stored by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Saint-Cloud, France.

New!!: Orbital period and Kilogram · See more »

List of periodic comets

Periodic comets (also known as short-period comets) are comets having orbital periods of less than 200 years or that have been observed during more than a single perihelion passage (e.g. 153P/Ikeya–Zhang).

New!!: Orbital period and List of periodic comets · See more »

Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.

New!!: Orbital period and Mars · See more »

Mercury (planet)

Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet in the Solar System.

New!!: Orbital period and Mercury (planet) · See more »

Metre

The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units (SI).

New!!: Orbital period and Metre · See more »

Moon

The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth and is Earth's only permanent natural satellite.

New!!: Orbital period and Moon · See more »

Natural satellite

A natural satellite or moon is, in the most common usage, an astronomical body that orbits a planet or minor planet (or sometimes another small Solar System body).

New!!: Orbital period and Natural satellite · See more »

Near-Earth object

A near-Earth object (NEO) is any small Solar System body whose orbit can bring it into proximity with Earth.

New!!: Orbital period and Near-Earth object · See more »

Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System.

New!!: Orbital period and Neptune · See more »

Nodal period

The nodal period (or draconic period) of a satellite is the time interval between successive passages of the satellite through either of its orbital nodes, typically the ascending node.

New!!: Orbital period and Nodal period · See more »

Opposition (planets)

In positional astronomy, two astronomical objects are said to be in opposition when they are on opposite sides of the celestial sphere, as observed from a given body (usually Earth).

New!!: Orbital period and Opposition (planets) · See more »

Orbit

In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved trajectory of an object, such as the trajectory of a planet around a star or a natural satellite around a planet.

New!!: Orbital period and Orbit · See more »

Orbital node

An orbital node is either of the two points where an orbit intersects a plane of reference to which it is inclined.

New!!: Orbital period and Orbital node · See more »

Orbital resonance

In celestial mechanics, an orbital resonance occurs when orbiting bodies exert a regular, periodic gravitational influence on each other, usually because their orbital periods are related by a ratio of small integers.

New!!: Orbital period and Orbital resonance · See more »

Perihelion and aphelion

The perihelion of any orbit of a celestial body about the Sun is the point where the body comes nearest to the Sun.

New!!: Orbital period and Perihelion and aphelion · See more »

Periodic function

In mathematics, a periodic function is a function that repeats its values in regular intervals or periods.

New!!: Orbital period and Periodic function · See more »

Perturbation (astronomy)

In astronomy, perturbation is the complex motion of a massive body subject to forces other than the gravitational attraction of a single other massive body.

New!!: Orbital period and Perturbation (astronomy) · See more »

Planet

A planet is an astronomical body orbiting a star or stellar remnant that is massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity, is not massive enough to cause thermonuclear fusion, and has cleared its neighbouring region of planetesimals.

New!!: Orbital period and Planet · See more »

Pluto

Pluto (minor planet designation: 134340 Pluto) is a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, a ring of bodies beyond Neptune.

New!!: Orbital period and Pluto · See more »

Precession

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body.

New!!: Orbital period and Precession · See more »

Proxima Centauri

Proxima Centauri, or Alpha Centauri C, is a red dwarf, a small low-mass star, about from the Sun in the constellation of Centaurus.

New!!: Orbital period and Proxima Centauri · See more »

Right ascension

Right ascension (abbreviated RA; symbol) is the angular distance measured only eastward along the celestial equator from the Sun at the March equinox to the (hour circle of the) point above the earth in question.

New!!: Orbital period and Right ascension · See more »

Rotation period

In astronomy, the rotation period of a celestial object is the time that it takes to complete one revolution around its axis of rotation relative to the background stars.

New!!: Orbital period and Rotation period · See more »

Saturn

Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second-largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter.

New!!: Orbital period and Saturn · See more »

Semi-major and semi-minor axes

In geometry, the major axis of an ellipse is its longest diameter: a line segment that runs through the center and both foci, with ends at the widest points of the perimeter.

New!!: Orbital period and Semi-major and semi-minor axes · See more »

Sidereal time

Sidereal time is a timekeeping system that astronomers use to locate celestial objects.

New!!: Orbital period and Sidereal time · See more »

Sidereal year

A sidereal year (from Latin sidus "asterism, star") is the time taken by the Earth to orbit the Sun once with respect to the fixed stars.

New!!: Orbital period and Sidereal year · See more »

Solar System

The Solar SystemCapitalization of the name varies.

New!!: Orbital period and Solar System · See more »

Solar time

Solar time is a calculation of the passage of time based on the position of the Sun in the sky.

New!!: Orbital period and Solar time · See more »

Standard gravitational parameter

In celestial mechanics, the standard gravitational parameter μ of a celestial body is the product of the gravitational constant G and the mass M of the body.

New!!: Orbital period and Standard gravitational parameter · See more »

Star

A star is type of astronomical object consisting of a luminous spheroid of plasma held together by its own gravity.

New!!: Orbital period and Star · See more »

Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System.

New!!: Orbital period and Sun · See more »

Time standard

A time standard is a specification for measuring time: either the rate at which time passes; or points in time; or both.

New!!: Orbital period and Time standard · See more »

Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun.

New!!: Orbital period and Uranus · See more »

Venus

Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days.

New!!: Orbital period and Venus · See more »

10 Hygiea

10 Hygiea is the fourth-largest asteroid in the Solar System by volume and mass, and it is located in the asteroid belt.

New!!: Orbital period and 10 Hygiea · See more »

2060 Chiron

2060 Chiron, provisional designation, and also known as 95P/Chiron, is a minor planet in the outer Solar System, orbiting the Sun between Saturn and Uranus.

New!!: Orbital period and 2060 Chiron · See more »

4 Vesta

Vesta, minor-planet designation 4 Vesta, is one of the largest objects in the asteroid belt, with a mean diameter of.

New!!: Orbital period and 4 Vesta · See more »

50000 Quaoar

50000 Quaoar, provisional designation, is a non-resonant trans-Neptunian object (cubewano) and possibly a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, located in the outermost region of the Solar System.

New!!: Orbital period and 50000 Quaoar · See more »

90377 Sedna

90377 Sedna is a large minor planet in the outer reaches of the Solar System that was,, at a distance of about 86 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun, about three times as far as Neptune.

New!!: Orbital period and 90377 Sedna · See more »

99942 Apophis

99942 Apophis (previously known by its provisional designation) is a near-Earth asteroid that caused a brief period of concern in December 2004 because initial observations indicated a probability of up to 2.7% that it would hit Earth on April 13, 2029.

New!!: Orbital period and 99942 Apophis · See more »

Redirects here:

Anomalistic period, Draconic period, Draconitic period, Orbit period, Orbital Period, Orbital periodicity, Period of the orbit, Sidereal period, Siderial period, Sideric, Sinodic period, Synodal, Synodic, Synodic Period, Synodic cycle, Synodic period, Synodic periods, Synodical, Tropical period.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_period

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »