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The Washington Post

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The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper founded on December 6, 1877. [1]

215 relations: Adrian Chen, Al Gore, Alexandria, Virginia, All the President's Men, Alliance for Audited Media, Andrew Cockburn, Annapolis, Maryland, Ashley Parker, Associated Press, Barack Obama, Beijing, Beirut, Ben Bradlee, Beriah Wilkins, Berlin, Bill Moyers, Bob Ehrlich, Bob Woodward, Bogotá, Boisfeuillet Jones Jr., Broadsheet, Bruce Bartlett, Cairo, Carl Bernstein, Carol D. Leonnig, Catherine Rampell, Chair of the Federal Reserve, Charles County, Maryland, Charles Krauthammer, Chris Matthews, Clifford K. Berryman, Columbia Journalism Review, Continental U.S. power transmission grid, Cyberwarfare, Daily Worker, Dan Balz, Dana Milbank, David Fahrenthold, David Ignatius, David Weigel, Deborah Howell, Democratic National Committee, Donald E. Graham, Donald Trump, East Coast of the United States, Ed O'Keefe (journalist), Edward Beale McLean, Eugene Meyer (financier), Eugene Robinson (journalist), Express (Washington, D.C. newspaper), ..., Fairfax County, Virginia, Fairfax Times, Fairfax, Virginia, Federal government of the United States, Forbes, Foreign Policy, Fortune (magazine), Frank Hatton (U.S. politician), Fred Ryan, George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush, George Will, Governor of Maryland, Greg Mitchell, Guild, Harper's Magazine, Harry Hughes, Heroin, High-rise building, Hillary Clinton, Holding company, Hong Kong, Howard Kurtz, Islamabad, J. Edgar Hoover, James Kirchick, James Russell Wiggins, Janet Cooke, Jeff Bezos, Jennifer Rubin (journalist), Jerusalem, John Philip Sousa, John R. McLean (publisher), Jonathan Yardley, K Street (Washington, D.C.), Kabul, Kaplan, Inc., Karoun Demirjian, Katharine Graham, Katharine Weymouth, Kathleen Parker, Laurel, Maryland, Leonard Downie Jr., List of newspapers in the United States, List of prizes won by The Washington Post, London, Los Angeles Times, Loudoun County, Virginia, Lyndon B. Johnson, Marc Thiessen, March (music), Marcus Brauchli, Marion Barry, Martin Baron, Maryland, Masthead (publishing), Mergers and acquisitions, Mexico City, Michael Dirda, Michael Dukakis, Michael Gerson, Montgomery County, Maryland, Morris Michtom, Moscow, MSNBC, Nairobi, Nameplate (publishing), Neoconservatism, New Delhi, New York Daily News, New York Post, News bureau, News World Communications, Newspaper, Nieman Fellowship, Northern Virginia, Novelty and fad dances, Ombudsman, One Franklin Square, Paris, Pentagon Papers, Personal History, Phil Graham, Philip Rucker, Phoenix, Arizona, Political journalism, Politico, Potomac River, Poynter Institute, Pravda, President of the United States, Prince George's County, Maryland, Prince William County, Virginia, Propaganda, PropOrNot, Pulitzer Prize, Reason (magazine), Richard Nixon, Richmond, Virginia, Robert Costa (journalist), Robert Parry (journalist), Rolling Stone, Russia, Ruth Marcus (journalist), San Francisco Chronicle, Shane Harris, Simon & Schuster, Slate (magazine), Southern Maryland, Spanish–American War, Springfield, Virginia, St. Mary's County, Maryland, Stilson Hutchins, Sun Myung Moon, Tablet computer, Teddy bear, The Baltimore Examiner, The Baltimore Sun, The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Daily Beast, The Gazette (Maryland), The Intercept, The Nation, The New Republic, The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Post (film), The Root (magazine), The San Francisco Examiner, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Daily News, The Washington Examiner, The Washington Post (march), The Washington Star, The Washington Times, Theodore Roosevelt, Tokyo, Two-step (dance move), Typographical error, Unification Church, United States, United States Congress, United States Marine Band, United States presidential election, 1988, United States presidential election, 2008, United States presidential election, 2016, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, USA Today, USS Maine (ACR-1), Virginia, Walter Pincus, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington Times-Herald, Washington, D.C., Washingtonian (magazine), Watergate complex, Watergate scandal, White House, William Greider, William McPherson (writer), William Randolph Hearst, Woodrow Wilson, 2002 Pulitzer Prize, 2003 invasion of Iraq, 2008 Pulitzer Prize. Expand index (165 more) »

Adrian Chen

Adrian Chen (born November 23, 1984) is an American journalist, and staff writer at The New Yorker.

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Al Gore

Albert Arnold Gore Jr. (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th Vice President of the United States from 1993 to 2001.

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Alexandria, Virginia

Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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All the President's Men

All the President's Men is a 1974 non-fiction book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, two of the journalists who investigated the first Watergate break-in and ensuing scandal for The Washington Post.

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Alliance for Audited Media

The Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) is a North American non-profit industry organization founded in 1914 by the Association of National Advertisers to help ensure media transparency and trust among advertisers and media companies.

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Andrew Cockburn

Andrew Myles Cockburn (born 7 January 1947) is an Irish journalist who has lived in the United States for many years.

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Annapolis, Maryland

Annapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Maryland, as well as the county seat of Anne Arundel County.

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Ashley Parker

Ashley R. Parker (born 1982) is an American journalist, a Pulitzer prize winning White House reporter for The Washington Post, and senior political analyst for MSNBC.

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Associated Press

The Associated Press (AP) is a U.S.-based not-for-profit news agency headquartered in New York City.

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Barack Obama

Barack Hussein Obama II (born August 4, 1961) is an American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from January 20, 2009, to January 20, 2017.

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Beijing

Beijing, formerly romanized as Peking, is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's second most populous city proper, and most populous capital city.

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Beirut

Beirut (بيروت, Beyrouth) is the capital and largest city of Lebanon.

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Ben Bradlee

Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee (1921 –, 2014) was an American newspaperman.

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Beriah Wilkins

Beriah Wilkins (July 10, 1846 – June 7, 1905) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

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Berlin

Berlin is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states.

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Bill Moyers

Billy Don Moyers (born June 5, 1934) is an American journalist and political commentator.

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Bob Ehrlich

Robert Leroy Ehrlich Jr. (born November 25, 1957) is an American lawyer and politician who served as the 60th Governor of Maryland from 2003 to 2007.

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Bob Woodward

Robert Upshur Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is an American investigative journalist and non-fiction author.

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Bogotá

Bogotá, officially Bogotá, Distrito Capital, abbreviated Bogotá, D.C., and formerly known as Santafé de Bogotá between 1991 and 2000, is the capital and largest city of Colombia, administered as the Capital District, although often thought of as part of Cundinamarca.

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Boisfeuillet Jones Jr.

Boisfeuillet "Bo" Jones Jr. (born 1946) was president and chief executive officer of MacNeil/Lehrer Productions in Arlington, Virginia.

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Broadsheet

A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically). Other common newspaper formats include the smaller Berliner and tabloid/compact formats.

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Bruce Bartlett

Bruce Reeves Bartlett (born October 11, 1951) is an American historian whose area of expertise is supply-side economics.

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Cairo

Cairo (القاهرة) is the capital of Egypt.

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Carl Bernstein

Carl Bernstein (born February 14, 1944) is an American investigative journalist and author.

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Carol D. Leonnig

Carol Duhurst Leonnig is an American investigative journalist.

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Catherine Rampell

Catherine Rampell is an American journalist and nationally syndicated opinion columnist.

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Chair of the Federal Reserve

The Chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is the head of the Federal Reserve, which is the central banking system of the United States.

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Charles County, Maryland

Charles County is a county located in the southern central portion of the U.S. state of Maryland.

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Charles Krauthammer

Irving Charles Krauthammer (March 13, 1950 – June 21, 2018) was an American political columnist whose weekly column was syndicated to more than 400 publications worldwide.

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Chris Matthews

Christopher John Matthews (born December 17, 1945) is an American political commentator, talk show host, and author.

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Clifford K. Berryman

Clifford Kennedy Berryman (April 2, 1869 – December 11, 1949) was a Pulitzer Prize–winning cartoonist with The Washington Star newspaper from 1907 to 1949.

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Columbia Journalism Review

The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists that has been published by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961.

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Continental U.S. power transmission grid

The electrical grid that powers mainland North America is divided into multiple regions.

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Cyberwarfare

Cyberwarfare is the use or targeting in a battlespace or warfare context of computers, online control systems and networks.

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Daily Worker

The Daily Worker was a newspaper published in New York City by the Communist Party USA, a formerly Comintern-affiliated organization.

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Dan Balz

Daniel Balz is an American journalist at The Washington Post, where he has been a political correspondent since 1978.

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Dana Milbank

Dana Timothy Milbank (born April 27, 1968) is an American author, and columnist for The Washington Post.

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David Fahrenthold

David A. Fahrenthold (born 1978) is an American journalist who writes for The Washington Post and serves as a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC.

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David Ignatius

David R. Ignatius (May 26, 1950), is an American journalist and novelist.

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David Weigel

David "Dave" Weigel (born September 26, 1981) is an American journalist.

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Deborah Howell

Deborah Howell (January 15, 1941 – January 2, 2010) was a long-time newswoman and editor who served for three years as the ombudsman for The Washington Post.

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Democratic National Committee

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the formal governing body for the United States Democratic Party.

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Donald E. Graham

Donald Edward Graham (born April 22, 1945) is Chairman of Graham Holdings Company.

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Donald Trump

Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017.

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East Coast of the United States

The East Coast of the United States is the coastline along which the Eastern United States meets the North Atlantic Ocean.

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Ed O'Keefe (journalist)

Ed O'Keefe (born March 28, 1983) is an American political correspondent with CBS News, which he joined in 2018, after spending nearly 13 years at The Washington Post.

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Edward Beale McLean

Edward Beale "Ned" McLean (1889 – July 28, 1941) was the publisher and owner of The Washington Post newspaper from 1916 until 1933.

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Eugene Meyer (financier)

Eugene Isaac Meyer (October 31, 1875 – July 17, 1959) was an American financier, public official, and newspaper publisher.

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Eugene Robinson (journalist)

Eugene Harold Robinson (born March 12, 1954) is an American newspaper columnist and an associate editor of The Washington Post.

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Express (Washington, D.C. newspaper)

The Express is a free daily newspaper, distributed in the Washington metropolitan area.

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Fairfax County, Virginia

Fairfax County, officially the County of Fairfax, is a predominantly suburban county — with urban and rural pockets — in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Fairfax Times

The Fairfax Times (also known as the Fairfax County Times) is a weekly newspaper published in Reston, Virginia which covers Fairfax County, Virginia.

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Fairfax, Virginia

Fairfax, colloquially known as Central Fairfax, Downtown Fairfax, or Fairfax City, and officially named the City of Fairfax, is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Federal government of the United States

The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government) is the national government of the United States, a constitutional republic in North America, composed of 50 states, one district, Washington, D.C. (the nation's capital), and several territories.

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Forbes

Forbes is an American business magazine.

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Foreign Policy

Foreign Policy is an American news publication, founded in 1970 and focused on global affairs, current events, and domestic and international policy.

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Fortune (magazine)

Fortune is an American multinational business magazine headquartered in New York City, United States.

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Frank Hatton (U.S. politician)

Frank Hatton (April 28, 1846 – April 30, 1894) was an American politician and newspaperman.

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Fred Ryan

Frederick J. Ryan Jr. (born April 12, 1955) is the publisher and chief executive officer of The Washington Post.

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George H. W. Bush

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 41st President of the United States from 1989 to 1993.

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George W. Bush

George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician who served as the 43rd President of the United States from 2001 to 2009.

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George Will

George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is an American political commentator.

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Governor of Maryland

The Governor of Maryland heads the executive branch of the government of the State of Maryland, and is the commander-in-chief of the state's National Guard units.

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Greg Mitchell

Greg Mitchell (born 1947) is an American author and journalist who has written twelve non-fiction books on United States politics and history of the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Guild

A guild is an association of artisans or merchants who oversee the practice of their craft/trade in a particular area.

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Harper's Magazine

Harper's Magazine (also called Harper's) is a monthly magazine of literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts.

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Harry Hughes

Harry Roe Hughes (born November 13, 1926), a member of the Democratic Party, was the 57th Governor of Maryland from 1979 to 1987.

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Heroin

Heroin, also known as diamorphine among other names, is an opioid most commonly used as a recreational drug for its euphoric effects.

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High-rise building

A high-rise building is a tall building, as opposed to a low-rise building and is defined by its height differently in various jurisdictions.

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Hillary Clinton

Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is an American politician and diplomat who served as the First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, U.S. Senator from New York from 2001 to 2009, 67th United States Secretary of State from 2009 to 2013, and the Democratic Party's nominee for President of the United States in the 2016 election.

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Holding company

A holding company is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock.

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Hong Kong

Hong Kong (Chinese: 香港), officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory of China on the eastern side of the Pearl River estuary in East Asia.

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Howard Kurtz

Howard Alan Kurtz (born August 1, 1953) is an American journalist and author best known for his coverage of the media.

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Islamabad

Islamabad (اسلام آباد) is the capital city of Pakistan located within the federal Islamabad Capital Territory.

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J. Edgar Hoover

John Edgar Hoover (January 1, 1895 – May 2, 1972) was an American law enforcement administrator and the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the United States.

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James Kirchick

James "Jamie" Kirchick (born 1983) is an American reporter, foreign correspondent, author, and columnist.

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James Russell Wiggins

James Russell Wiggins (December 4, 1903 – November 19, 2000) was managing editor of The Washington Post and United States Ambassador to the United Nations.

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Janet Cooke

Janet Leslie Cooke (born July 23, 1954) is a former American journalist.

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Jeff Bezos

Jeffrey Preston Bezos (born Jorgensen; January 12, 1964) is an American technology entrepreneur, investor, philanthropist, and the founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Amazon, the world's largest online retailer.

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Jennifer Rubin (journalist)

Jennifer Rubin (born June 11, 1962) is an American journalist.

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Jerusalem

Jerusalem (יְרוּשָׁלַיִם; القُدس) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

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John Philip Sousa

John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era, known primarily for American military and patriotic marches.

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John R. McLean (publisher)

John Roll McLean (17 September 1848 – 9 June 1916) was the owner and publisher of The Washington Post and The Cincinnati Enquirer.

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Jonathan Yardley

Jonathan Yardley (born October 27, 1939) was the book critic at The Washington Post from 1981 to December 2014, and held the same post from 1978 to 1981 at the Washington Star.

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K Street (Washington, D.C.)

K Street is a major thoroughfare in the United States capital of Washington, D.C. known as a center for numerous think tanks, lobbyists, and advocacy groups.

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Kabul

Kabul (کابل) is the capital of Afghanistan and its largest city, located in the eastern section of the country.

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Kaplan, Inc.

Kaplan, Inc. is a for-profit corporation that provides educational services to colleges and universities and corporations and businesses, including higher education programs, professional training and certifications, test preparation and student support services.

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Karoun Demirjian

Karoun A. Demirjian (born April 28, 1981) is a multimedia international journalist and freelance reporter at the Washington Post covering defense and foreign policy and was previously a correspondent based in the Post's bureau in Moscow.

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Katharine Graham

Katharine Meyer "Kay" Graham (née Meyer; June 16, 1917 – July 17, 2001) was an American publisher and the first female publisher of a major American newspaper.

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Katharine Weymouth

Katharine Bouchage Weymouth (born 1966) is the former publisher of The Washington Post and chief executive officer of Washington Post Media. She resigned effective October 1, 2014, one year after Amazon.com's Jeff Bezos took over ownership of the newspaper company.

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Kathleen Parker

Kathleen Parker is a politically conservative-leaning columnist for The Washington Post.

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Laurel, Maryland

Laurel is a city in northern Prince George's County, Maryland, in the United States, located almost midway between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore on the banks of the Patuxent River.

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Leonard Downie Jr.

Leonard "Len" Downie Jr. (born May 1, 1942), the American journalist, was Executive Editor of The Washington Post from 1991 to 2008.

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List of newspapers in the United States

This is a list of newspapers printed and distributed in the United States.

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List of prizes won by The Washington Post

The following is a list of awards won by American newspaper The Washington Post.

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London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California since 1881.

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Loudoun County, Virginia

Loudoun County is a county in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908January 22, 1973), often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after having served as the 37th Vice President of the United States from 1961 to 1963.

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Marc Thiessen

Marc Alexander Thiessen (1967) is an American Republican author, columnist and political commentator.

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March (music)

A march, as a musical genre, is a piece of music with a strong regular rhythm which in origin was expressly written for marching to and most frequently performed by a military band.

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Marcus Brauchli

Marcus W. Brauchli (born June 19, 1961) is a media investor and advisor.

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Marion Barry

Marion Shepilov Barry (born Marion Barry Jr.; March 6, 1936 – November 23, 2014) was an American politician who served as the second Mayor of the District of Columbia from 1979 to 1991, and again as the fourth mayor from 1995 to 1999.

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Martin Baron

Martin "Marty" Baron (born October 24, 1954) is an American journalist who has been editor of The Washington Post since December 31, 2012, after having been editor of The Boston Globe from 2001 to 2012.

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Maryland

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east.

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Masthead (publishing)

In American usage, a publication's masthead is a printed list, published in a fixed position in each edition, of its owners, departments, officers and address details, which in British English usage is known as imprint.

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Mergers and acquisitions

Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) are transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations, or their operating units are transferred or consolidated with other entities.

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Mexico City

Mexico City, or the City of Mexico (Ciudad de México,; abbreviated as CDMX), is the capital of Mexico and the most populous city in North America.

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Michael Dirda

Michael Dirda (born 1948) is a book critic for the Washington Post.

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Michael Dukakis

Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is a retired American politician who served as the 65th Governor of Massachusetts, from 1975 to 1979 and again from 1983 to 1991.

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Michael Gerson

Michael John Gerson (born May 15, 1964) is an op-ed columnist for The Washington Post, a Policy Fellow with the ONE Campaign, a visiting fellow with the Center for Public Justice, and a former senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Montgomery County, Maryland

Montgomery County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of Maryland, located adjacent to Washington, D.C. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 971,777, increasing by 9.0% to an estimated 1,058,810 in 2017.

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Morris Michtom

Morris Michtom (1870 – July 21, 1938), was a Russian-born businessman and inventor, who with his wife Rose, invented the teddy bear in 1902.

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Moscow

Moscow (a) is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 13.2 million residents within the city limits and 17.1 million within the urban area.

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MSNBC

MSNBC is an American news cable and satellite television network that provides news coverage and political commentary from NBC News on current events.

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Nairobi

Nairobi is the capital and the largest city of Kenya.

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Nameplate (publishing)

In American usage, a periodical publication's nameplate is its designed title as it appears on the front page or cover.

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Neoconservatism

Neoconservatism (commonly shortened to neocon when labelling its adherents) is a political movement born in the United States during the 1960s among liberal hawks who became disenchanted with the increasingly pacifist foreign policy of the Democratic Party, and the growing New Left and counterculture, in particular the Vietnam protests.

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New Delhi

New Delhi is an urban district of Delhi which serves as the capital of India and seat of all three branches of Government of India.

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New York Daily News

The New York Daily News, officially titled Daily News, is an American newspaper based in New York City.

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New York Post

The New York Post is the fourth-largest newspaper in the United States and a leading digital media publisher that reached more than 57 million unique visitors in the U.S. in January 2017.

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News bureau

A news bureau is an office for gathering or distributing news.

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News World Communications

News World Communications Inc. is an international news media corporation.

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Newspaper

A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events.

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Nieman Fellowship

The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard awards multiple types of fellowships.

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Northern Virginia

Northern Virginia – locally referred to as NOVA – comprises several counties and independent cities in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Novelty and fad dances

Fad dances are dances which are characterized by a short burst of popularity, while novelty dances typically have a longer-lasting popularity based on their being characteristically humorous or humor-invoking, as well as the sense of uniqueness which they have.

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Ombudsman

An ombudsman, ombud, or public advocate is an official who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints of maladministration or a violation of rights.

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One Franklin Square

One Franklin Square is a high-rise building at 1301 K Street NW, in Washington, D.C, United States.

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Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of and a population of 2,206,488.

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Pentagon Papers

The Pentagon Papers, officially titled Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force, is a United States Department of Defense history of the United States' political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967.

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Personal History

Personal History is the autobiography of Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham.

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Phil Graham

Philip Leslie Graham (July 18, 1915 – August 3, 1963) was an American newspaperman best known as publisher and later co-owner of The Washington Post and its parent company, The Washington Post Company.

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Philip Rucker

Philip James Madelen Rucker is a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter and the White House Bureau Chief at the Washington Post, where he has been working since 2005.

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Phoenix, Arizona

Phoenix is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Arizona.

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Political journalism

Political journalism is a broad branch of journalism that includes coverage of all aspects of politics and political science, although the term usually refers specifically to coverage of civil governments and political power.

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Politico

Politico, known earlier as The Politico, is an American political journalism company based in Arlington County, Virginia, that covers politics and policy in the United States and internationally.

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Potomac River

The Potomac River is located within the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States and flows from the Potomac Highlands into the Chesapeake Bay.

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Poynter Institute

The Poynter Institute for Media Studies is a non-profit school for journalism located in St. Petersburg, Florida.

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Pravda

Pravda (a, "Truth") is a Russian broadsheet newspaper, formerly the official newspaper of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, when it was one of the most influential papers in the country with a circulation of 11 million.

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President of the United States

The President of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

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Prince George's County, Maryland

Prince George’s County (often shortened to "PG County") is a county in the U.S. state of Maryland, bordering the eastern portion of Washington, D.C. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population was 863,420, making it the second-most populous county in Maryland, behind only Montgomery County.

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Prince William County, Virginia

Prince William County is a county on the Potomac River in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Propaganda

Propaganda is information that is not objective and is used primarily to influence an audience and further an agenda, often by presenting facts selectively to encourage a particular synthesis or perception, or using loaded language to produce an emotional rather than a rational response to the information that is presented.

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PropOrNot

PropOrNot is a group that seeks to expose what it calls Russian propaganda and groups that use material from Russian sources.

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Pulitzer Prize

The Pulitzer Prize is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States.

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Reason (magazine)

Reason is an American libertarian monthly magazine published by the Reason Foundation.

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Richard Nixon

Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was an American politician who served as the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 until 1974, when he resigned from office, the only U.S. president to do so.

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Richmond, Virginia

Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

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Robert Costa (journalist)

Robert Costa (born October 14, 1985) is an American journalist.

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Robert Parry (journalist)

Robert Parry (June 24, 1949 – January 27, 2018) was an American investigative journalist best known for his role in covering the Iran-Contra affair for the Associated Press (AP) and Newsweek, including breaking the Psychological Operations in Guerrilla Warfare (CIA manual provided to the Nicaraguan contras) and the CIA and Contras cocaine trafficking in the US scandal in 1985.

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Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone is an American monthly magazine that focuses on popular culture.

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Russia

Russia (rɐˈsʲijə), officially the Russian Federation (p), is a country in Eurasia. At, Russia is the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with over 144 million people as of December 2017, excluding Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital Moscow is one of the largest cities in the world; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. The East Slavs emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland on the west to Alaska on the east. Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world's first constitutionally socialist state. The Soviet Union played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II, and emerged as a recognized superpower and rival to the United States during the Cold War. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human-made satellite and the launching of the first humans in space. By the end of 1990, the Soviet Union had the world's second largest economy, largest standing military in the world and the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, twelve independent republics emerged from the USSR: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Baltic states regained independence: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania; the Russian SFSR reconstituted itself as the Russian Federation and is recognized as the continuing legal personality and a successor of the Soviet Union. It is governed as a federal semi-presidential republic. The Russian economy ranks as the twelfth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity in 2015. Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources are the largest such reserves in the world, making it one of the leading producers of oil and natural gas globally. The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Russia is a great power as well as a regional power and has been characterised as a potential superpower. It is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and an active global partner of ASEAN, as well as a member of the G20, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as being the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and one of the five members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), along with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

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Ruth Marcus (journalist)

Ruth Allyn Marcus is an American journalist who currently writes an op-ed column for The Washington Post.

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San Francisco Chronicle

The San Francisco Chronicle is a newspaper serving primarily the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California.

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Shane Harris

Shane Harris is an American journalist and author.

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Simon & Schuster

Simon & Schuster, Inc., a subsidiary of CBS Corporation, is an American publishing company founded in New York City in 1924 by Richard Simon and Max Schuster.

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Slate (magazine)

Slate is an online magazine that covers current affairs, politics, and culture in the United States from a liberal perspective.

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Southern Maryland

Southern Maryland in popular usage is composed of the state's southernmost counties on the "Western Shore" of the Chesapeake Bay in the state of Maryland.

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Spanish–American War

The Spanish–American War (Guerra hispano-americana or Guerra hispano-estadounidense; Digmaang Espanyol-Amerikano) was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898.

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Springfield, Virginia

Springfield is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States.

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St. Mary's County, Maryland

Saint Mary's County (often abbreviated as St. Mary's County), established in 1637, is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland.

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Stilson Hutchins

Stilson Hutchins (November 14, 1838 – April 23, 1912) was an American newspaper reporter and publisher, best known as founder of The Washington Post.

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Sun Myung Moon

Sun Myung Moon (Korean 문선명 Mun Seon-myeong; born Mun Yong-myeong; 25 February 1920 – 3 September 2012) was a Korean religious leader, also known for his business ventures and support of social and political causes.

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Tablet computer

A tablet computer, commonly shortened to tablet, is a portable personal computer, typically with a mobile operating system and LCD touchscreen display processing circuitry, and a rechargeable battery in a single thin, flat package.

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Teddy bear

A teddy bear is a soft toy in the form of a bear.

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The Baltimore Examiner

The Baltimore Examiner was a free daily newspaper, one of the two big dailies in Baltimore, Maryland (the other being The Baltimore Sun).

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The Baltimore Sun

The Baltimore Sun is the largest general-circulation daily newspaper based in the American state of Maryland and provides coverage of local and regional news, events, issues, people, and industries.

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The Cincinnati Enquirer

The Cincinnati Enquirer is a morning daily newspaper published by Gannett Company in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States.

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The Daily Beast

The Daily Beast is an American news and opinion website focused on politics and pop culture.

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The Gazette (Maryland)

The Gazette published weekly community newspapers serving Montgomery, Prince George's, and Carroll counties in Maryland, including a subscription-based weekend edition covering business and politics throughout the state.

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The Intercept

The Intercept is an online news publication dedicated to what it describes as "adversarial journalism".

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The Nation

The Nation is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States, and the most widely read weekly journal of progressive political and cultural news, opinion, and analysis.

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The New Republic

The New Republic is a liberal American magazine of commentary on politics and the arts, published since 1914, with influence on American political and cultural thinking.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The New Yorker

The New Yorker is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry.

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The Post (film)

The Post is a 2017 American historical political thriller film directed and produced by Steven Spielberg and written by Liz Hannah and Josh Singer.

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The Root (magazine)

The Root is an online magazine launched on January 28, 2008, by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Donald E. Graham, and was owned by Graham Holdings Company through its online subsidiary, The Slate Group.

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The San Francisco Examiner

The San Francisco Examiner is a longtime daily newspaper distributed in and around San Francisco, California.

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The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

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The Washington Daily News

The Washington Daily News was an afternoon tabloid-size newspaper serving the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area.

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The Washington Examiner

The Washington Examiner is an American political journalism website and weekly magazine based in Washington, D.C. that covers politics and policy in the United States and internationally.

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The Washington Post (march)

"The Washington Post" is a march composed by John Philip Sousa in 1889.

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The Washington Star

The Washington Star, previously known as the Washington Star-News and the Washington Evening Star, was a daily afternoon newspaper published in Washington, D.C. between 1852 and 1981.

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The Washington Times

The Washington Times is an American daily newspaper that covers general interest topics with a particular emphasis on American politics.

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Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman and writer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

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Tokyo

, officially, is one of the 47 prefectures of Japan and has been the capital since 1869.

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Two-step (dance move)

The two-step is a step found in various dances, including many folk dances.

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Typographical error

A typographical error (often shortened to typo), also called misprint, is a mistake made in the typing process (such as a spelling mistake) of printed material.

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Unification Church

The Unification Church (UC), also called the Unification movement and sometimes colloquially the "Moonies", is a worldwide new religious movement that was founded by and is inspired by Sun Myung Moon, a Korean religious leader also known for his business ventures and support of social and political causes.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

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United States Marine Band

The United States Marine Band is the premier band of the United States Marine Corps.

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United States presidential election, 1988

The United States presidential election of 1988 was the 51st quadrennial United States presidential election.

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United States presidential election, 2008

The United States presidential election of 2008 was the 56th quadrennial presidential election.

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United States presidential election, 2016

The United States presidential election of 2016 was the 58th quadrennial American presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

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University of North Carolina at Pembroke

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP), also known as UNC Pembroke, is a public, co-educational, historically American Indian liberal arts university in the town of Pembroke in Robeson County, North Carolina, United States.

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USA Today

USA Today is an internationally distributed American daily, middle-market newspaper that serves as the flagship publication of its owner, the Gannett Company.

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USS Maine (ACR-1)

USS Maine (ACR-1) was an American naval ship that sank in Havana Harbor during the Cuban revolt against Spain, an event that became a major political issue in the United States.

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Virginia

Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

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Walter Pincus

Walter Haskell Pincus (born December 24, 1932) is a national security journalist.

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Walter Reed Army Medical Center

The Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) — known as Walter Reed General Hospital (WRGH) until 1951 — was the U.S. Army's flagship medical center from 1909 to 2011.

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Washington Times-Herald

The Washington Times-Herald (1939–1954) was an American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. It was created by Eleanor "Cissy" Patterson of the Medill–McCormick–Patterson family (long-time owners of the Chicago Tribune and the New York Daily News and founding later Newsday on New York's Long Island) when she bought The Washington Times and The Washington Herald from the syndicate newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst (1863–1951), and merged them.

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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Washingtonian (magazine)

The Washingtonian is a monthly magazine distributed in the Washington, D.C. area.

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Watergate complex

The Watergate complex is a group of six buildings in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in the United States, known particularly for the infamous 1972 burglary of the Democratic National Committee, which ultimately led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon.

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Watergate scandal

The Watergate scandal was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 1972, and President Richard Nixon's administration's subsequent attempt to cover up its involvement.

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White House

The White House is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States.

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William Greider

William Harold Greider (born August 6, 1936) is an American journalist and author who writes primarily about economics.

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William McPherson (writer)

William McPherson (March 16, 1933 – March 28, 2017) was an American writer and journalist.

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William Randolph Hearst

William Randolph Hearst Sr. (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American businessman, politician, and newspaper publisher who built the nation's largest newspaper chain and media company Hearst Communications and whose flamboyant methods of yellow journalism influenced the nation's popular media by emphasizing sensationalism and human interest stories.

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Woodrow Wilson

Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was an American statesman and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

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2002 Pulitzer Prize

A listing of the Pulitzer Prize award winners for 2002.

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2003 invasion of Iraq

The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first stage of the Iraq War (also called Operation Iraqi Freedom).

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2008 Pulitzer Prize

The 2008 Pulitzer Prizes were announced on April 7, 2008, the 92nd annual awards.

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Democracy Dies In Darkness, Political stance of The Washington Post, Stephen P. Hills, The Washington Post Book World, The Washington Post Magazine, The Washington Post National Weekly Edition, The Washington Post Times Herald, The Washington Post and Times-Herald, WP Company LLC, WPost, WaPo, WaPost, Wapo.com, Wapo.st, Wash Post, Wash. Post, WashPo, WashPost, Washingon Post, Washington Post, Washington Post Book World, Washington Post Magazine, Washington Post Online, Washington Post Times Herald, Washington post, WashingtonPost.com, Washingtonpost, Washingtonpost.com.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Washington_Post

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