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Secession in the United States

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In the context of the United States, secession primarily refers to the withdrawal of one or more States from the Union that constitutes the United States; but may loosely refer to leaving a State or territory to form a separate territory or new State, or to the severing of an area from a city or county within a State. [1]

207 relations: A Summary View of the Rights of British America, Akhil Amar, Alabama, Alaska, Alaska Supreme Court, Alaskan Independence Party, Albert Gallatin, Alexander Hamilton, Algernon Sidney, Alien and Sedition Acts, American Civil War, American Lion (book), American Redoubt, American Revolution, Andrew Jackson, Annapolis Convention (1786), Anti-Federalism, Appomattox Campaign, Arkansas, Articles of Confederation, Avalon Project, Battle of Fort Sumter, Benjamin Lundy, British Columbia, Bruce Catton, Calabash, North Carolina, California, California National Party, Carolina Shores, North Carolina, Cascadia (independence movement), Common Sense (pamphlet), Conch Republic, Confederate government of Kentucky, Confederate government of Missouri, Confederate States of America, Constitution of Virginia, Constitutional Convention (United States), Constitutional right, Cornell Law School, Daily Mail, Daniel A. Farber, Daniel Webster, De facto, De jure, Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union, Democratic-Republican Party, District of Columbia v. Heller, Donald Livingston, Donald Trump, Dumas Malone, ..., Elizabeth R. Varon, Embargo Act of 1807, Emer de Vattel, Fairfax Resolves, Federalist, Federalist No. 43, Federalist Party, Florida, Forrest McDonald, Free State Project, Gary, Indiana, George III of the United Kingdom, Georgia (U.S. state), Georgia State Senate, Gibbons v. Ogden, Gordon S. Wood, Gouverneur Morris, Government in exile, Harold Covington, Hartford Convention, Hawaii, Hawaiian sovereignty movement, Houston Chronicle, Idaho, Indiana, James Buchanan, James Madison, John Adams, John C. Calhoun, John E. Ferling, John Jay, John Locke, John Marshall, John Milton, John Pickering (judge), John Taylor of Caroline, John Zogby, Kentucky, Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, Killington, Vermont, Kirkpatrick Sale, Lakota people, League of the South, Libertarian Party (United States), Library of Congress, List of national founders, List of U.S. county secession proposals, List of U.S. state partition proposals, Los Angeles Times, Louisiana, Louisiana Purchase, Massachusetts General Court, Mexican–American War, Michael P. Riccards, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, Miller Beach, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Neo-Confederate, New Hampshire, New Hampshire Grants, New York State Assembly, North Carolina, Northwest Territorial Imperative, Nullification Crisis, Ordinance of Secession, Oregon, Origins of the American Civil War, Pacific Northwest, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Patrick Henry, Pauline Maier, Philadelphia, Presidency of Barack Obama, Proclamation to the People of South Carolina, Province of New York, Red states and blue states, Republic, Republic of Lakotah proposal, Republic of Texas, Republic of Texas (group), Restored Government of Virginia, Reuters, Rhode Island, Rick Perry, Right of revolution, RT (TV network), San Fernando Valley, Secession, Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, Second Vermont Republic, Slavery in the United States, South Carolina, South Carolina Exposition and Protest, South Carolina in the American Civil War, Southern Party, Sovereign state, St. George Tucker, Star-News, State of the Union, Staten Island, States' rights, Submissionist, Supreme Court of the United States, Tampa Bay Times, Tariff of 1832, Tariff of Abominations, Tea Party protests, Tennessee, Texas, Texas annexation, Texas Revolution, Texas secession movements, Texas v. White, The American Conservative, The Boston Globe, The Federalist Papers, The Guardian, The Independent, The Liberator (newspaper), The New York Sun, The New York Times, The Oregonian, The Washington Post, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Naylor, Thomas Paine, Three-Fifths Compromise, TimesDaily, Timothy Bigelow (lawyer), Timothy Pickering, Twitter, Two Treatises of Government, Union (American Civil War), United States, United States Constitution, United States Declaration of Independence, United States presidential election, 1800, United States presidential election, 2012, United States presidential election, 2016, University of Chicago, Vermont, Virginia, Virginia v. West Virginia, Wally Hickel, War of 1812, Washington (state), We the People (petitioning system), Whiggism, William Lloyd Garrison, Wilmot Proviso, Yale Law School, Yes California, 2012 U.S. state secession petitions, 2016 Portland, Oregon riots, 51st state. Expand index (157 more) »

A Summary View of the Rights of British America

A Summary View of the Rights of British America was a tract written by Thomas Jefferson in 1774, before the U.S. Declaration of Independence, in which he laid out for delegates to the First Continental Congress a set of grievances against King George III, especially against the King's and Parliament's response to the Boston Tea Party.

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Akhil Amar

Akhil Reed Amar (born September 6, 1958) is an American legal scholar, an expert on constitutional law and criminal procedure.

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Alabama

Alabama is a state in the southeastern region of the United States.

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Alaska

Alaska (Alax̂sxax̂) is a U.S. state located in the northwest extremity of North America.

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Alaska Supreme Court

The Alaska Supreme Court is the state supreme court in the State of Alaska's judiciary (the Alaska Court System).

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Alaskan Independence Party

The Alaskan Independence Party (AKIP) is a political party and independence movement in the U.S. state of Alaska that advocates an in-state referendum which includes the option of Alaska becoming an independent country.

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Albert Gallatin

Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761 – August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American politician, diplomat, ethnologist and linguist.

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Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was a statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

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Algernon Sidney

Algernon Sidney or Sydney (14 or 15 January 1623 – 7 December 1683) was an English politician and member of the middle part of the Long Parliament.

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Alien and Sedition Acts

The Alien and Sedition Acts were four bills passed by the Federalist-dominated 5th United States Congress and signed into law by President John Adams in 1798.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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American Lion (book)

American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House is a 2008 biography by Jon Meacham of Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States.

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American Redoubt

The American Redoubt is a political migration movement first proposed in 2011 by best-selling survivalist novelist and blogger James Wesley Rawles which designates three states in the northwestern United States (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming), and adjoining portions of two other states (eastern Oregon, and eastern Washington) as a safe haven for conservative, libertarian-leaning Christians and Jews.

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American Revolution

The American Revolution was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783.

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Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

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Annapolis Convention (1786)

The Annapolis Convention, formally titled as a Meeting of Commissioners to Remedy Defects of the Federal Government, was a national political convention held September 11–14, 1786 at Mann's Tavern in Annapolis, Maryland, in which twelve delegates from five states—New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Virginia—gathered to discuss and develop a consensus about reversing the protectionist trade barriers that each state had erected.

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Anti-Federalism

Anti-Federalism refers to a movement that opposed the creation of a stronger U.S. federal government and which later opposed the ratification of the 1787 Constitution.

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Appomattox Campaign

The Appomattox Campaign was a series of American Civil War battles fought March 29 – April 9, 1865 in Virginia that concluded with the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia to forces of the Union Army (Army of the Potomac, Army of the James and Army of the Shenandoah) under the overall command of Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant.

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Arkansas

Arkansas is a state in the southeastern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2017.

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Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution.

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Avalon Project

The Avalon Project is a digital library of documents relating to law, history and diplomacy.

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Battle of Fort Sumter

The Battle of Fort Sumter (April 12–13, 1861) was the bombardment of Fort Sumter near Charleston, South Carolina by the Confederate States Army, and the return gunfire and subsequent surrender by the United States Army, that started the American Civil War.

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Benjamin Lundy

Benjamin Lundy (January 4, 1789August 22, 1839) was an American Quaker abolitionist from New Jersey of the United States who established several anti-slavery newspapers and traveled widely.

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British Columbia

British Columbia (BC; Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean and the Rocky Mountains.

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Bruce Catton

Charles Bruce Catton (October 9, 1899 – August 28, 1978) was an American historian and journalist, known best for his books concerning the American Civil War.

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Calabash, North Carolina

Calabash is a small fishing town in Brunswick County, North Carolina, United States.

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California

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States.

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California National Party

The California National Party (CNP) (Partido Nacional de California, PNC) is a political party in the state of California.

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Carolina Shores, North Carolina

Carolina Shores is a town in Brunswick County, North Carolina, United States.

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Cascadia (independence movement)

Cascadia is a bioregion and proposed country located within the western region of North America.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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Common Sense (pamphlet)

Common Sense is a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine in 1775–76 advocating independence from Great Britain to people in the Thirteen Colonies.

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Conch Republic

The Conch Republic is a micronation declared as a tongue-in-cheek secession of the city of Key West, Florida, from the United States on April 23, 1982.

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Confederate government of Kentucky

The Confederate government of Kentucky was a shadow government established for the Commonwealth of Kentucky by a self-constituted group of Confederate sympathizers during the American Civil War.

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Confederate government of Missouri

The Confederate government of Missouri was a shadow government, established for the state of Missouri by pro-Confederate Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson and other Southern sympathizers, during the American Civil War.

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Confederate States of America

The Confederate States of America (CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865.

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Constitution of Virginia

The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Virginia is the document that defines and limits the powers of the state government and the basic rights of the citizens of the U.S. Commonwealth of Virginia.

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Constitutional Convention (United States)

The Constitutional Convention (also known as the Philadelphia Convention, the Federal Convention, or the Grand Convention at Philadelphia) took place from May 25 to September 17, 1787, in the old Pennsylvania State House (later known as Independence Hall because of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence there eleven years before) in Philadelphia.

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Constitutional right

A constitutional right can be a prerogative or a duty, a power or a restraint of power, recognized and established by a sovereign state or union of states.

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Cornell Law School

Cornell Law School is the law school of Cornell University, a private Ivy League university located in Ithaca, New York.

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Daily Mail

The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-marketPeter Wilby, New Statesman, 19 December 2013 (online version: 2 January 2014) tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust and published in London.

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Daniel A. Farber

Daniel A. Farber (born July 16, 1950) is an American author and historian.

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Daniel Webster

Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782October 24, 1852) was an American politician who represented New Hampshire (1813–1817) and Massachusetts (1823–1827) in the United States House of Representatives; served as a Senator from Massachusetts (1827–1841, 1845–1850); and was the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison (1841), John Tyler (1841–1843), and Millard Fillmore (1850–1852).

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De facto

In law and government, de facto (or;, "in fact") describes practices that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised by official laws.

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De jure

In law and government, de jure (lit) describes practices that are legally recognised, whether or not the practices exist in reality.

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Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union

The Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union was a proclamation issued on December 24, 1860, by the government of South Carolina to explain its reasons for seceding from the United States.

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Democratic-Republican Party

The Democratic-Republican Party was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was secretary of the treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.

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District of Columbia v. Heller

District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), is a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that Washington, D.C.'s handgun ban and requirement that lawfully-owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee.

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Donald Livingston

Donald Livingston is a former Professor of Philosophy at Emory University and a David Hume scholar.

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Donald Trump

Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017.

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Dumas Malone

Dumas Malone (January 10, 1892 – December 27, 1986) was an American historian, biographer, and editor noted for his six-volume biography on Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson and His Time, for which he received the 1975 Pulitzer Prize for history.

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Elizabeth R. Varon

' Elizabeth R. Varon (born December 16, 1963) is an American historian, and Langbourne M. Williams Professor of American History at the University of Virginia.

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Embargo Act of 1807

The Embargo Act of 1807 was a general embargo enacted by the United States Congress against Great Britain and France during the Napoleonic Wars.

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Emer de Vattel

Emer (Emmerich) de Vattel (25 April 1714 – 28 December 1767) was an international lawyer.

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Fairfax Resolves

The Fairfax Resolves was a set of resolutions adopted by a committee in Fairfax County in the colony of Virginia on July 18, 1774, in the early stages of the American Revolution.

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Federalist

The term federalist describes several political beliefs around the world.

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Federalist No. 43

Federalist No.

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Federalist Party

The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration party until the 3rd United States Congress (as opposed to their opponents in the Anti-Administration party), was the first American political party.

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Florida

Florida (Spanish for "land of flowers") is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States.

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Forrest McDonald

Forrest McDonald (January 7, 1927 – January 19, 2016) was an American historian, who wrote extensively on the early national period of the United States, on republicanism, and on the presidency, though he is possibly best known for his polemic on the American South.

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Free State Project

The Free State Project (FSP) is a proposed political migration founded in 2001 to recruit at least 20,000 libertarians to move to a single low-population state (New Hampshire, selected in 2003) in order to make the state a stronghold for libertarian ideas.

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Gary, Indiana

Gary is a city in Lake County, Indiana, United States, from downtown Chicago, Illinois.

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George III of the United Kingdom

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.

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Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern United States.

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Georgia State Senate

The Georgia State Senate is the upper house of the Georgia General Assembly (the state legislature of Georgia, USA).

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Gibbons v. Ogden

Gibbons v. Ogden, was a landmark decision in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the power to regulate interstate commerce, granted to Congress by the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution, encompassed the power to regulate navigation.

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Gordon S. Wood

Gordon Stewart Wood (born November 27, 1933) is Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University, and the recipient of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Radicalism of the American Revolution (1992).

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Gouverneur Morris

Gouverneur Morris I (30 January 1752 – 6 November 1816) was an American statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, and a signatory to the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution.

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Government in exile

A government in exile is a political group which claims to be a country or semi-sovereign state's legitimate government, but is unable to exercise legal power and instead resides in another state or foreign country.

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Harold Covington

Harold Armstead Covington (born September 14, 1953) is an American neo-Nazi activist and writer.

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Hartford Convention

The Hartford Convention was a series of meetings from December 15, 1814 – January 5, 1815, in Hartford, Connecticut, United States, in which the New England Federalist Party met to discuss their grievances concerning the ongoing War of 1812 and the political problems arising from the federal government's increasing power.

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Hawaii

Hawaii (Hawaii) is the 50th and most recent state to have joined the United States, having received statehood on August 21, 1959.

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Hawaiian sovereignty movement

The Hawaiian sovereignty movement (ke ea Hawaii) is a grassroots political and cultural campaign to gain sovereignty, self-determination and self-governance for Hawaiians of whole or part Native Hawaiian ancestry with an autonomous or independent nation or kingdom.

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Houston Chronicle

The Houston Chronicle is the largest daily newspaper in Houston, Texas, United States.

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Idaho

Idaho is a state in the northwestern region of the United States.

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Indiana

Indiana is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern and Great Lakes regions of North America.

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James Buchanan

James Buchanan Jr. (April 23, 1791June 1, 1868) was an American politician who served as the 15th President of the United States (1857–61), serving immediately prior to the American Civil War.

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James Madison

James Madison Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

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John Adams

John Adams (October 30 [O.S. October 19] 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the first Vice President (1789–1797) and second President of the United States (1797–1801).

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John C. Calhoun

John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782March 31, 1850) was an American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina, and the seventh Vice President of the United States from 1825 to 1832.

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John E. Ferling

John E. Ferling (born 1940) is a professor emeritus of history at the University of West Georgia.

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John Jay

John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).

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John Locke

John Locke (29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".

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John Marshall

John James Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American politician and the fourth Chief Justice of the United States from 1801 to 1835.

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John Milton

John Milton (9 December 16088 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under its Council of State and later under Oliver Cromwell.

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John Pickering (judge)

John Pickering (September 22, 1737 – April 11, 1805) served as chief justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court of Judicature, and as judge for the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire.

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John Taylor of Caroline

John Taylor (December 19, 1753August 21, 1824), usually called John Taylor of Caroline, was a politician and writer.

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John Zogby

John J. Zogby (born September 3, 1948) is an American public opinion pollster, author, and public speaker.

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Kentucky

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States.

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Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions

The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions (or Resolves) were political statements drafted in 1798 and 1799, in which the Kentucky and Virginia legislatures took the position that the federal Alien and Sedition Acts were unconstitutional.

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Killington, Vermont

Killington is a town in Rutland County, Vermont, United States.

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Kirkpatrick Sale

Kirkpatrick Sale (born June 27, 1937) is an independent scholar and author who has written prolifically about political decentralism, environmentalism, luddism and technology.

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Lakota people

The Lakota (pronounced, Lakota language: Lakȟóta) are a Native American tribe.

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League of the South

The League of the South is a white nationalist, Neo-Confederate, white supremacist organization, headquartered in Killen, Alabama, which states that its ultimate goal is "a free and independent Southern republic".

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Libertarian Party (United States)

The Libertarian Party (LP) is a libertarian political party in the United States that promotes civil liberties, non-interventionism, laissez-faire capitalism and shrinking the size and scope of government.

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Library of Congress

The Library of Congress (LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States.

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List of national founders

The following list of national founding figures is a record, by country, of people who were credited with establishing their nation.

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List of U.S. county secession proposals

This is a list of county secession proposals in the United States; that is, proposed new counties to be formed from existing counties within a given state, but that have not yet been formed.

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List of U.S. state partition proposals

Since the establishment of the United States in 1776, numerous state partition proposals have been put forward that would partition an existing state (or states) in order that a particular region within might either join another state, or create a new state.

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Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California since 1881.

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Louisiana

Louisiana is a state in the southeastern region of the United States.

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Louisiana Purchase

The Louisiana Purchase (Vente de la Louisiane "Sale of Louisiana") was the acquisition of the Louisiana territory (828,000 square miles or 2.14 million km²) by the United States from France in 1803.

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Massachusetts General Court

The Massachusetts General Court (formally styled the General Court of Massachusetts) is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

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Mexican–American War

The Mexican–American War, also known as the Mexican War in the United States and in Mexico as the American intervention in Mexico, was an armed conflict between the United States of America and the United Mexican States (Mexico) from 1846 to 1848.

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Michael P. Riccards

Michael P. Riccards (born October 2, 1944 in Elizabeth, New Jersey) is an American political scientist, writer, and professor.

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Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

The Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS), formerly known as the Monterey Institute of International Studies, is an American graduate school within Middlebury College, a private university located in Middlebury, Vermont.

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Miller Beach

Miller Beach (also commonly known as Miller) is a neighborhood of Gary, Indiana on the southernmost shore of Lake Michigan.

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Mississippi

Mississippi is a state in the Southern United States, with part of its southern border formed by the Gulf of Mexico.

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Missouri

Missouri is a state in the Midwestern United States.

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Montana

Montana is a state in the Northwestern United States.

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Neo-Confederate

Neo-Confederate, or Southern Nationalist, is a term used to describe the views of various groups and individuals who use historical revisionism to portray the Confederate States of America and its actions in the American Civil War in a positive light.

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New Hampshire

New Hampshire is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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New Hampshire Grants

The New Hampshire Grants or Benning Wentworth Grants were land grants made between 1749 and 1764 by the colonial governor of the Province of New Hampshire, Benning Wentworth.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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New York State Assembly

The New York State Assembly is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Senate being the upper house.

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North Carolina

North Carolina is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States.

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Northwest Territorial Imperative

The Northwest Territorial Imperative (often shortened to the Northwest Imperative) is a white separatist idea popularized since the 1980s within white nationalist and white supremacist groups in the United States.

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Nullification Crisis

The Nullification Crisis was a United States sectional political crisis in 1832–33, during the presidency of Andrew Jackson, which involved a confrontation between South Carolina and the federal government.

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Ordinance of Secession

The Ordinance of Secession is the general name given to documents drafted and ratified in 1860 and 1861 by each of the thirteen southern states and the Territory of Arizona formally seceding from the United States of America.

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Oregon

Oregon is a state in the Pacific Northwest region on the West Coast of the United States.

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Origins of the American Civil War

Historians debating the origins of the American Civil War focus on the reasons why seven Southern states declared their secession from the United States (the Union), why they united to form the Confederate States of America (or simply known as the "Confederacy"), and why the North refused to let them go.

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Pacific Northwest

The Pacific Northwest (PNW), sometimes referred to as Cascadia, is a geographic region in western North America bounded by the Pacific Ocean to the west and (loosely) by the Cascade Mountain Range on the east.

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Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, often shortened to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or nicknamed Obamacare, is a United States federal statute enacted by the 111th United States Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010.

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Patrick Henry

Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736June 6, 1799) was an American attorney, planter, and orator well known for his declaration to the Second Virginia Convention (1775): "Give me liberty, or give me death!" A Founding Father, he served as the first and sixth post-colonial Governor of Virginia, from 1776 to 1779 and from 1784 to 1786.

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Pauline Maier

Pauline Alice Maier (née Rubbelke; April 27, 1938 – August 12, 2013) was a revisionist historian of the American Revolution, though her work also addressed the late colonial period and the history of the United States after the end of the Revolutionary War.

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Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863.

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Presidency of Barack Obama

The presidency of Barack Obama began at noon EST on January 20, 2009, when Barack Obama was inaugurated as 44th President of the United States, and ended on January 20, 2017.

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Proclamation to the People of South Carolina

The Proclamation to the People of South Carolina was written by Edward Livingston and issued by Andrew Jackson on December 10, 1832.

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Province of New York

The Province of New York (1664–1776) was a British proprietary colony and later royal colony on the northeast coast of North America.

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Red states and blue states

Since the 2000 United States presidential election, red states and blue states have referred to states of the United States whose voters predominantly choose either the Republican Party (red) or Democratic Party (blue) presidential candidates.

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Republic

A republic (res publica) is a form of government in which the country is considered a "public matter", not the private concern or property of the rulers.

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Republic of Lakotah proposal

The Republic of Lakotah or Lakotah is a proposed independent republic in North America for the Lakota people and other people.

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Republic of Texas

The Republic of Texas (República de Tejas) was an independent sovereign state in North America that existed from March 2, 1836, to February 19, 1846.

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Republic of Texas (group)

The Republic of Texas is a general term for several organizations, some of which have been called militia groups, that claim the annexation of Texas by the United States was illegal and that Texas remains an independent nation to this day, but is under occupation.

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Restored Government of Virginia

The Restored Government of Virginia, also known as the Reorganized Government of Virginia, was the Unionist government of Virginia during the American Civil War (1861–1865).

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Reuters

Reuters is an international news agency headquartered in London, United Kingdom.

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Rhode Island

Rhode Island, officially the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, is a state in the New England region of the United States.

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Rick Perry

James Richard Perry (born March 4, 1950) is an American politician who is the 14th and current United States Secretary of Energy, serving in the Cabinet of Donald Trump.

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Right of revolution

In political philosophy, the right of revolution (or right of rebellion) is the right or duty of the people of a nation to overthrow a government that acts against their common interests and/or threatens the safety of the people without cause.

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RT (TV network)

RT (formerly Russia Today) is a Russian international television network funded by the Russian government.

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San Fernando Valley

The San Fernando Valley is an urbanized valley in Los Angeles County, California, defined by the mountains of the Transverse Ranges circling it.

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Secession

Secession (derived from the Latin term secessio) is the withdrawal of a group from a larger entity, especially a political entity, but also from any organization, union or military alliance.

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Second Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Second Amendment (Amendment II) to the United States Constitution protects the right of the people to keep and bear arms and was adopted on December 15, 1791, as part of the first ten amendments contained in the Bill of Rights.

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Second Vermont Republic

The Second Vermont Republic (SVR, 2VR) is a secessionist group within the U.S. state of Vermont which seeks to restore the formerly independent status of the Vermont Republic (1777–91).

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Slavery in the United States

Slavery in the United States was the legal institution of human chattel enslavement, primarily of Africans and African Americans, that existed in the United States of America in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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South Carolina

South Carolina is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States.

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South Carolina Exposition and Protest

The South Carolina Exposition and Protest, also known as Calhoun's Exposition, was written in December 1828 by John C. Calhoun, then Vice President of the United States under John Quincy Adams and later under Andrew Jackson.

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South Carolina in the American Civil War

South Carolina was the first state to secede from the Union in December 1860, and was one of the founding member states of the Confederacy in February 1861.

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Southern Party

The Southern Party (SP) was a minor political party in the United States that operated exclusively in the South.

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Sovereign state

A sovereign state is, in international law, a nonphysical juridical entity that is represented by one centralized government that has sovereignty over a geographic area.

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St. George Tucker

St.

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Star-News

Star-News is the daily newspaper for Wilmington, North Carolina, and its surrounding area (known as the Lower Cape Fear).

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State of the Union

The State of the Union Address is an annual message presented by the President of the United States to a joint session of the United States Congress, except in the first year of a new president's term.

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Staten Island

Staten Island is the southernmost and westernmost of the five boroughs of New York City in the U.S. state of New York.

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States' rights

In American political discourse, states' rights are political powers held for the state governments rather than the federal government according to the United States Constitution, reflecting especially the enumerated powers of Congress and the Tenth Amendment.

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Submissionist

Submissionist was the term used by southern secessionists in the year preceding the American Civil War to describe southerners who wanted to preserve the Union.

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Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest federal court of the United States.

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Tampa Bay Times

The Tampa Bay Times, previously named the St.

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Tariff of 1832

The Tariff of 1832 (22nd Congress, session 1, ch. 227,, enacted July 14, 1832) was a protectionist tariff in the United States.

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Tariff of Abominations

The "Tariff of Abominations" was a protective tariff passed by the Congress of the United States on May 19, 1828, designed to protect industry in the northern United States.

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Tea Party protests

The Tea Party protests were a series of well-funded protests throughout the United States that began in early 2009.

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Tennessee

Tennessee (translit) is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States.

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Texas

Texas (Texas or Tejas) is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population.

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Texas annexation

The Texas Annexation was the 1845 incorporation of the Republic of Texas into the United States of America, which was admitted to the Union as the 28th state on December 29, 1845.

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Texas Revolution

The Texas Revolution (October 2, 1835 – April 21, 1836) was a rebellion of colonists from the United States and Tejanos (Texas Mexicans) in putting up armed resistance to the centralist government of Mexico.

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Texas secession movements

Texas secession movements principally focus on the secession of Texas during the American Civil War and the activities of organizations that have existed since the 1990s.

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Texas v. White

Texas v. White, was a case argued before the United States Supreme Court in 1869.

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The American Conservative

The American Conservative (TAC) is a bi-monthly magazine founded in 2002 and published by the American Ideas Institute, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) organization based in Washington, D.C., which states that it exists to promote a conservatism that opposes unchecked power in government and business; promotes the flourishing of families and communities through vibrant markets and free people; and embraces realism and restraint in foreign affairs based on America's vital national interests.

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The Boston Globe

The Boston Globe (sometimes abbreviated as The Globe) is an American daily newspaper founded and based in Boston, Massachusetts, since its creation by Charles H. Taylor in 1872.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

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The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper.

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The Independent

The Independent is a British online newspaper.

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The Liberator (newspaper)

The Liberator (1831–1865) was an American abolitionist newspaper founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Isaac Knapp.

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The New York Sun

The New York Sun was an American daily newspaper published in Manhattan from 2002 to 2008.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Oregonian

The Oregonian is a daily newspaper based in Portland, Oregon, owned by Advance Publications.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper founded on December 6, 1877.

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Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (April 13, [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

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Thomas Naylor

Thomas Herbert Naylor (May 30, 1936 – December 12, 2012) was an American economist and professor.

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Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine (born Thomas Pain; – In the contemporary record as noted by Conway, Paine's birth date is given as January 29, 1736–37. Common practice was to use a dash or a slash to separate the old-style year from the new-style year. In the old calendar, the new year began on March 25, not January 1. Paine's birth date, therefore, would have been before New Year, 1737. In the new style, his birth date advances by eleven days and his year increases by one to February 9, 1737. The O.S. link gives more detail if needed. – June 8, 1809) was an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist and revolutionary.

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Three-Fifths Compromise

The Three-Fifths Compromise was a compromise reached among state delegates during the 1787 United States Constitutional Convention.

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TimesDaily

The TimesDaily is the daily newspaper for Florence, Alabama.

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Timothy Bigelow (lawyer)

Timothy Bigelow (April 30, 1767 – May 18, 1821) was an American lawyer in early 19th-century Massachusetts.

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Timothy Pickering

Timothy Pickering (July 17, 1745January 29, 1829) was a politician from Massachusetts who served in a variety of roles, most notably as the third United States Secretary of State under Presidents George Washington and John Adams.

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Twitter

Twitter is an online news and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets".

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Two Treatises of Government

Two Treatises of Government (or Two Treatises of Government: In the Former, The False Principles, and Foundation of Sir Robert Filmer, and His Followers, Are Detected and Overthrown. The Latter Is an Essay Concerning The True Original, Extent, and End of Civil Government) is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke.

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Union (American Civil War)

During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the Union, also known as the North, referred to the United States of America and specifically to the national government of President Abraham Lincoln and the 20 free states, as well as 4 border and slave states (some with split governments and troops sent both north and south) that supported it.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

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United States Declaration of Independence

The United States Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776.

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United States presidential election, 1800

The United States presidential election of 1800 was the fourth United States presidential election.

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United States presidential election, 2012

The United States presidential election of 2012 was the 57th quadrennial American presidential election.

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United States presidential election, 2016

The United States presidential election of 2016 was the 58th quadrennial American presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

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University of Chicago

The University of Chicago (UChicago, U of C, or Chicago) is a private, non-profit research university in Chicago, Illinois.

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Vermont

Vermont is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Virginia

Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

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Virginia v. West Virginia

Virginia v. West Virginia,, is a 6-to-3 ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States which held that where a governor has discretion in the conduct of the election, the legislature is bound by his action and cannot undo the results based on fraud.

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Wally Hickel

Walter Joseph "Wally" Hickel (August 18, 1919 – May 7, 2010) was an American businessman and politician.

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War of 1812

The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States, the United Kingdom, and their respective allies from June 1812 to February 1815.

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Washington (state)

Washington, officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

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We the People (petitioning system)

We the People, launched September 22, 2011, was a section of the whitehouse.gov website (under President Barack Obama) for petitioning the administration's policy experts.

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Whiggism

Whiggism (in North America sometimes spelled Whigism) is a historical political philosophy that grew out of the Parliamentarian faction in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms (1639–1651).

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William Lloyd Garrison

William Lloyd Garrison (December, 1805 – May 24, 1879) was a prominent American abolitionist, journalist, suffragist, and social reformer.

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Wilmot Proviso

The Wilmot Proviso proposed an American law to ban slavery in territory acquired from Mexico in the Mexican War.

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Yale Law School

Yale Law School (often referred to as Yale Law or YLS) is the law school of Yale University, located in New Haven, Connecticut, United States.

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Yes California

The Yes California Independence Campaign is an American political action committee, founded by Louis J. Marinelli, that promotes the secession of the state of California from the United States.

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2012 U.S. state secession petitions

In 2012, a number of state petitions to allow state secession were set up using the White House's petitioning system.

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2016 Portland, Oregon riots

On November 10, 2016, three days of protests in Portland, Oregon, turned into a riot, when a group of self-described anarchists broke off from a larger group of peaceful protesters who were opposed to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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51st state

The "51st state", in post-1959 American political discourse, is a phrase that refers to areas or locales that are – seriously or facetiously – considered candidates for U.S. statehood, joining the 50 states that presently compose the United States.

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Redirects here:

"Alaska back to Russia" petitions for secession, American secessionism, Flexit, Secession in the united states, Southern secessionism, Southern secessionists, Southern-secessionism, Southern-secessionists.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secession_in_the_United_States

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