Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Economy

Index Economy

An economy (from Greek οίκος – "household" and νέμoμαι – "manage") is an area of the production, distribution, or trade, and consumption of goods and services by different agents. [1]

198 relations: Adam Smith, Agent (economics), Agriculture, Amschel Mayer Rothschild, Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek, Ancient history, Anthropology, Antwerp, Applied science, Babylonia, Babysitting, Balance of trade, Bank, Barley, Barter, Biodiversity loss, Black market, Board of chosen freeholders, Business administration, Business ethics, Capital (economics), Capitalism, Car, Child labour, Christopher Columbus, Citizenship, City-state, Coal, Colony, Commerce, Commodity money, Company, Competition, Consumer spending, Consumerism, Consumption (economics), Credit, Currency, Customs, Debits and credits, Debt, Debt bondage, Demand, Developing country, Distribution (economics), Division of labour, Ecological economics, Econometrics, Economic anthropology, ..., Economic equilibrium, Economic geography, Economic growth, Economic history, Economic sector, Economic sociology, Economic system, Economic union, Economics, Economics education, Economist, Economy, Ecosystem services, Engineering, English language, Europe, Exchange rate, Extensive farming, Factor price, Film, Finance, France, Free trade, Friedrich Hayek, Geography, Gift economy, Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici, Globalization, Goods, Goods and services, Government debt, Great Britain, Great Depression, Greek language, Green economy, Gross domestic product, Gross national product, History, History of money, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Human overpopulation, Industrial relations, Industrial Revolution, Industry, Inflation, Information economy, Infrastructure, Innovation, Interest rate, Internet, Investment, Iron, Jakob Fugger, John Kenneth Galbraith, John Maynard Keynes, Keynesian economics, Knowledge economy, List of economists, List of free-trade agreements, List of multilateral free-trade agreements, Lists of countries by GDP per capita, Low-carbon economy, Macroeconomics, Maize, Management, Manufacturing, Marco Polo, Market (economics), Market economy, Mass production, Medium of exchange, Mercantilism, Merchant, Mesopotamia, Metric (mathematics), Microeconomics, Middle Ages, Milton Friedman, Mining, Monoculture, Nation state, Neoliberalism, Netherlands, New World, Nobility, North America, Physiocracy, Planned economy, Portugal, Post-industrial society, Postmodernism, Primary sector of the economy, Private sector, Product (business), Production (economics), Profession, Protectionism, Public interest, Public sector, Quaternary sector of the economy, Raw material, Real gross domestic product, Real versus nominal value (economics), Research, Revolutions of 1989, Saving, Scarcity, Secondary sector of the economy, Secretary of state, Secularization, Service (economics), Shekel, Social group, Social market economy, Social science, Socialism, Sociology, Spain, Stock exchange, Stock market, Subsistence agriculture, Subsistence economy, Sumer, Supply (economics), Supply and demand, Technology, Tertiary sector of the economy, Textile, The Affluent Society, The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, The Wall Street Journal, Thermoeconomics, Thomas Robert Malthus, Three-sector theory, Trade, Transport, Unemployment, United Kingdom, Universal access to education, Value (economics), Vasco da Gama, Venture capital, Voluntary sector, Wirtschaftswunder, Wood, World, World economy, World war. Expand index (148 more) »

Adam Smith

Adam Smith (16 June 1723 NS (5 June 1723 OS) – 17 July 1790) was a Scottish economist, philosopher and author as well as a moral philosopher, a pioneer of political economy and a key figure during the Scottish Enlightenment era.

New!!: Economy and Adam Smith · See more »

Agent (economics)

In economics, an agent is an actor and more specifically a decision maker in a model of some aspect of the economy.

New!!: Economy and Agent (economics) · See more »

Agriculture

Agriculture is the cultivation of land and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.

New!!: Economy and Agriculture · See more »

Amschel Mayer Rothschild

Baron Amschel Mayer von Rothschild (12 June 1773 – 6 December 1855) was a German Jewish banker of the wealthy Rothschild family.

New!!: Economy and Amschel Mayer Rothschild · See more »

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

New!!: Economy and Ancient Greece · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Economy and Ancient Greek · See more »

Ancient history

Ancient history is the aggregate of past events, "History" from the beginning of recorded human history and extending as far as the Early Middle Ages or the post-classical history.

New!!: Economy and Ancient history · See more »

Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humans and human behaviour and societies in the past and present.

New!!: Economy and Anthropology · See more »

Antwerp

Antwerp (Antwerpen, Anvers) is a city in Belgium, and is the capital of Antwerp province in Flanders.

New!!: Economy and Antwerp · See more »

Applied science

Applied science is the application of existing scientific knowledge to practical applications, like technology or inventions.

New!!: Economy and Applied science · See more »

Babylonia

Babylonia was an ancient Akkadian-speaking state and cultural area based in central-southern Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq).

New!!: Economy and Babylonia · See more »

Babysitting

Babysitting is temporarily caring for a child.

New!!: Economy and Babysitting · See more »

Balance of trade

The balance of trade, commercial balance, or net exports (sometimes symbolized as NX), is the difference between the monetary value of a nation's exports and imports over a certain period.

New!!: Economy and Balance of trade · See more »

Bank

A bank is a financial institution that accepts deposits from the public and creates credit.

New!!: Economy and Bank · See more »

Barley

Barley (Hordeum vulgare), a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally.

New!!: Economy and Barley · See more »

Barter

In trade, barter is a system of exchange where participants in a transaction directly exchange goods or services for other goods or services without using a medium of exchange, such as money.

New!!: Economy and Barter · See more »

Biodiversity loss

Loss of biodiversity or biodiversity loss is the extinction of species (human, plant or animal) worldwide, and also the local reduction or loss of species in a certain habitat.

New!!: Economy and Biodiversity loss · See more »

Black market

A black market, underground economy, or shadow economy is a clandestine market or transaction that has some aspect of illegality or is characterized by some form of noncompliant behavior with an institutional set of rules.

New!!: Economy and Black market · See more »

Board of chosen freeholders

In New Jersey, a board of chosen freeholders is the county legislature in each of the state's 21 counties.

New!!: Economy and Board of chosen freeholders · See more »

Business administration

Business administration is management of a business.

New!!: Economy and Business administration · See more »

Business ethics

Business ethics (also known as corporate ethics) is a form of applied ethics or professional ethics, that examines ethical principles and moral or ethical problems that can arise in a business environment.

New!!: Economy and Business ethics · See more »

Capital (economics)

In economics, capital consists of an asset that can enhance one's power to perform economically useful work.

New!!: Economy and Capital (economics) · See more »

Capitalism

Capitalism is an economic system based upon private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit.

New!!: Economy and Capitalism · See more »

Car

A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation.

New!!: Economy and Car · See more »

Child labour

Child labour refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.

New!!: Economy and Child labour · See more »

Christopher Columbus

Christopher Columbus (before 31 October 145120 May 1506) was an Italian explorer, navigator, and colonizer.

New!!: Economy and Christopher Columbus · See more »

Citizenship

Citizenship is the status of a person recognized under the custom or law as being a legal member of a sovereign state or belonging to a nation.

New!!: Economy and Citizenship · See more »

City-state

A city-state is a sovereign state, also described as a type of small independent country, that usually consists of a single city and its dependent territories.

New!!: Economy and City-state · See more »

Coal

Coal is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams.

New!!: Economy and Coal · See more »

Colony

In history, a colony is a territory under the immediate complete political control of a state, distinct from the home territory of the sovereign.

New!!: Economy and Colony · See more »

Commerce

Commerce relates to "the exchange of goods and services, especially on a large scale.” Commerce includes legal, economic, political, social, cultural and technological systems that operate in any country or internationally.

New!!: Economy and Commerce · See more »

Commodity money

Commodity money is money whose value comes from a commodity of which it is made.

New!!: Economy and Commodity money · See more »

Company

A company, abbreviated as co., is a legal entity made up of an association of people for carrying on a commercial or industrial enterprise.

New!!: Economy and Company · See more »

Competition

Competition is, in general, a contest or rivalry between two or more entities, organisms, animals, individuals, economic groups or social groups, etc., for territory, a niche, for scarce resources, goods, for mates, for prestige, recognition, for awards, for group or social status, or for leadership and profit.

New!!: Economy and Competition · See more »

Consumer spending

Consumer spending, consumption, or consumption expenditure is the acquisition of goods and services by individuals or families.

New!!: Economy and Consumer spending · See more »

Consumerism

Consumerism is a social and economic order and ideology that encourages the acquisition of goods and services in ever-increasing amounts.

New!!: Economy and Consumerism · See more »

Consumption (economics)

Consumption is the process in which consumers (customers or buyers) purchase items on the market.

New!!: Economy and Consumption (economics) · See more »

Credit

Credit (from Latin credit, "(he/she/it) believes") is the trust which allows one party to provide money or resources to another party where that second party does not reimburse the first party immediately (thereby generating a debt), but instead promises either to repay or return those resources (or other materials of equal value) at a later date.

New!!: Economy and Credit · See more »

Currency

A currency (from curraunt, "in circulation", from currens, -entis), in the most specific use of the word, refers to money in any form when in actual use or circulation as a medium of exchange, especially circulating banknotes and coins.

New!!: Economy and Currency · See more »

Customs

Customs is an authority or agency in a country responsible for collecting tariffs and for controlling the flow of goods, including animals, transports, personal, and hazardous items, into and out of a country.

New!!: Economy and Customs · See more »

Debits and credits

In double entry bookkeeping, debits and credits (abbreviated Dr and Cr, respectively) are entries made in account ledgers to record changes in value resulting from business transactions.

New!!: Economy and Debits and credits · See more »

Debt

Debt is when something, usually money, is owed by one party, the borrower or debtor, to a second party, the lender or creditor.

New!!: Economy and Debt · See more »

Debt bondage

Debt bondage, also known as debt slavery or bonded labour, is a person's pledge of labour or services as security for the repayment for a debt or other obligation, where there is no hope of actually repaying the debt.

New!!: Economy and Debt bondage · See more »

Demand

In economics, demand is the quantities of a commodity or a service that people are willing and able to buy at various prices, over a given period of time.

New!!: Economy and Demand · See more »

Developing country

A developing country (or a low and middle income country (LMIC), less developed country, less economically developed country (LEDC), underdeveloped country) is a country with a less developed industrial base and a low Human Development Index (HDI) relative to other countries.

New!!: Economy and Developing country · See more »

Distribution (economics)

In economics, distribution is the way total output, income, or wealth is distributed among individuals or among the factors of production (such as labour, land, and capital).

New!!: Economy and Distribution (economics) · See more »

Division of labour

The division of labour is the separation of tasks in any system so that participants may specialize.

New!!: Economy and Division of labour · See more »

Ecological economics

Ecological economics (also called eco-economics, ecolonomy or bioeconomics of Georgescu-Roegen) is both a transdisciplinary and an interdisciplinary field of academic research addressing the interdependence and coevolution of human economies and natural ecosystems, both intertemporally and spatially.

New!!: Economy and Ecological economics · See more »

Econometrics

Econometrics is the application of statistical methods to economic data and is described as the branch of economics that aims to give empirical content to economic relations.

New!!: Economy and Econometrics · See more »

Economic anthropology

Economic anthropology is a field that attempts to explain human economic behavior in its widest historic, geographic and cultural scope.

New!!: Economy and Economic anthropology · See more »

Economic equilibrium

In economics, economic equilibrium is a state where economic forces such as supply and demand are balanced and in the absence of external influences the (equilibrium) values of economic variables will not change.

New!!: Economy and Economic equilibrium · See more »

Economic geography

Economic geography is the study of the location, distribution and spatial organization of economic activities across the world.

New!!: Economy and Economic geography · See more »

Economic growth

Economic growth is the increase in the inflation-adjusted market value of the goods and services produced by an economy over time.

New!!: Economy and Economic growth · See more »

Economic history

Economic history is the study of economies or economic phenomena of the past.

New!!: Economy and Economic history · See more »

Economic sector

One classical breakdown of economic activity distinguishes three sectors.

New!!: Economy and Economic sector · See more »

Economic sociology

Economic sociology is the study of the social cause and effect of various economic phenomena.

New!!: Economy and Economic sociology · See more »

Economic system

An economic system is a system of production, resource allocation and distribution of goods and services within a society or a given geographic area.

New!!: Economy and Economic system · See more »

Economic union

An economic union is a type of trade bloc which is composed of a common market with a customs union.

New!!: Economy and Economic union · See more »

Economics

Economics is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

New!!: Economy and Economics · See more »

Economics education

Economics education or economic education is a field within economics that focuses on two main themes: 1) the current state of, and efforts to improve, the economics curriculum, materials and pedagogical techniques used to teach economics at all educational levels; and 2) research into the effectiveness of alternative instructional techniques in economics, the level of economic literacy of various groups, and factors that influence the level of economic literacy. Economics education is distinct from economics of education, which focuses on the economics of the institution of education.

New!!: Economy and Economics education · See more »

Economist

An economist is a practitioner in the social science discipline of economics.

New!!: Economy and Economist · See more »

Economy

An economy (from Greek οίκος – "household" and νέμoμαι – "manage") is an area of the production, distribution, or trade, and consumption of goods and services by different agents.

New!!: Economy and Economy · See more »

Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are the many and varied benefits that humans freely gain from the natural environment and from properly-functioning ecosystems.

New!!: Economy and Ecosystem services · See more »

Engineering

Engineering is the creative application of science, mathematical methods, and empirical evidence to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures, machines, materials, devices, systems, processes, and organizations.

New!!: Economy and Engineering · See more »

English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

New!!: Economy and English language · See more »

Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

New!!: Economy and Europe · See more »

Exchange rate

In finance, an exchange rate is the rate at which one currency will be exchanged for another.

New!!: Economy and Exchange rate · See more »

Extensive farming

Extensive farming or extensive agriculture (as opposed to intensive farming) is an agricultural production system that uses small inputs of labor, fertilizers, and capital, relative to the land area being farmed.

New!!: Economy and Extensive farming · See more »

Factor price

In economic theory, the price of a finished item affects the factors of production, the various costs and incentives of producing it, so as to 'attract' it toward a theoretical Factor price.

New!!: Economy and Factor price · See more »

Film

A film, also called a movie, motion picture, moving pícture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images.

New!!: Economy and Film · See more »

Finance

Finance is a field that is concerned with the allocation (investment) of assets and liabilities (known as elements of the balance statement) over space and time, often under conditions of risk or uncertainty.

New!!: Economy and Finance · See more »

France

France, officially the French Republic (République française), is a sovereign state whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.

New!!: Economy and France · See more »

Free trade

Free trade is a free market policy followed by some international markets in which countries' governments do not restrict imports from, or exports to, other countries.

New!!: Economy and Free trade · See more »

Friedrich Hayek

Friedrich August von Hayek (8 May 189923 March 1992), often referred to by his initials F. A. Hayek, was an Austrian-British economist and philosopher best known for his defense of classical liberalism.

New!!: Economy and Friedrich Hayek · See more »

Geography

Geography (from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, literally "earth description") is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of Earth.

New!!: Economy and Geography · See more »

Gift economy

A gift economy, gift culture, or gift exchange is a mode of exchange where valuables are not traded or sold, but rather given without an explicit agreement for immediate or future rewards.

New!!: Economy and Gift economy · See more »

Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici

Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici (c. 1360 – 20/28 February 1429) was an Italian banker and founder of the Medici Bank.

New!!: Economy and Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici · See more »

Globalization

Globalization or globalisation is the process of interaction and integration between people, companies, and governments worldwide.

New!!: Economy and Globalization · See more »

Goods

In economics, goods are materials that satisfy human wants and provide utility, for example, to a consumer making a purchase of a satisfying product.

New!!: Economy and Goods · See more »

Goods and services

Goods are items that are tangible, such as pens, salt, apples, oganesson, and hats.

New!!: Economy and Goods and services · See more »

Government debt

Government debt (also known as public interest, public debt, national debt and sovereign debt) is the debt owed by a government.

New!!: Economy and Government debt · See more »

Great Britain

Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe.

New!!: Economy and Great Britain · See more »

Great Depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States.

New!!: Economy and Great Depression · See more »

Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

New!!: Economy and Greek language · See more »

Green economy

The green economy is defined as an economy that aims at reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities, and that aims for sustainable development without degrading the environment.

New!!: Economy and Green economy · See more »

Gross domestic product

Gross domestic product (GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time.

New!!: Economy and Gross domestic product · See more »

Gross national product

Gross national product (GNP) is the market value of all the goods and services produced in one year by labor and property supplied by the citizens of a country.

New!!: Economy and Gross national product · See more »

History

History (from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.

New!!: Economy and History · See more »

History of money

The history of money concerns the development of means of carrying out transactions involving a medium of exchange.

New!!: Economy and History of money · See more »

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) is an educational and trade publisher in the United States.

New!!: Economy and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt · See more »

Human overpopulation

Human overpopulation (or population overshoot) occurs when the ecological footprint of a human population in a specific geographical location exceeds the carrying capacity of the place occupied by that group.

New!!: Economy and Human overpopulation · See more »

Industrial relations

Industrial relations is a multidisciplinary field that studies the employment relationship.

New!!: Economy and Industrial relations · See more »

Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840.

New!!: Economy and Industrial Revolution · See more »

Industry

Industry is the production of goods or related services within an economy.

New!!: Economy and Industry · See more »

Inflation

In economics, inflation is a sustained increase in price level of goods and services in an economy over a period of time.

New!!: Economy and Inflation · See more »

Information economy

Information economy is an economy with an increased emphasis on informational activities and information industry.

New!!: Economy and Information economy · See more »

Infrastructure

Infrastructure is the fundamental facilities and systems serving a country, city, or other area, including the services and facilities necessary for its economy to function.

New!!: Economy and Infrastructure · See more »

Innovation

Innovation can be defined simply as a "new idea, device or method".

New!!: Economy and Innovation · See more »

Interest rate

An interest rate is the amount of interest due per period, as a proportion of the amount lent, deposited or borrowed (called the principal sum).

New!!: Economy and Interest rate · See more »

Internet

The Internet is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide.

New!!: Economy and Internet · See more »

Investment

In general, to invest is to allocate money (or sometimes another resource, such as time) in the expectation of some benefit in the future – for example, investment in durable goods, in real estate by the service industry, in factories for manufacturing, in product development, and in research and development.

New!!: Economy and Investment · See more »

Iron

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from ferrum) and atomic number 26.

New!!: Economy and Iron · See more »

Jakob Fugger

Jakob Fugger of the Lily (Jakob Fugger von der Lilie) (6 March 1459 – 30 December 1525), also known as Jakob Fugger the Rich or sometimes Jakob II, was a major German merchant, mining entrepreneur and banker.

New!!: Economy and Jakob Fugger · See more »

John Kenneth Galbraith

John Kenneth Galbraith (October 15, 1908 - April 29, 2006), also known as Ken Galbraith, was a Canadian-born economist, public official, and diplomat, and a leading proponent of 20th-century American liberalism.

New!!: Economy and John Kenneth Galbraith · See more »

John Maynard Keynes

John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes (5 June 1883 – 21 April 1946), was a British economist whose ideas fundamentally changed the theory and practice of macroeconomics and the economic policies of governments.

New!!: Economy and John Maynard Keynes · See more »

Keynesian economics

Keynesian economics (sometimes called Keynesianism) are the various macroeconomic theories about how in the short run – and especially during recessions – economic output is strongly influenced by aggregate demand (total demand in the economy).

New!!: Economy and Keynesian economics · See more »

Knowledge economy

The knowledge economy is the use of knowledge (savoir, savoir-faire, savoir-être) to generate tangible and intangible values.

New!!: Economy and Knowledge economy · See more »

List of economists

This is an incomplete alphabetical list by surname of notable economists, experts in the social science of economics, past and present.

New!!: Economy and List of economists · See more »

List of free-trade agreements

The List of free-trade agreements has been split into.

New!!: Economy and List of free-trade agreements · See more »

List of multilateral free-trade agreements

This is a list of multilateral free-trade agreements, between several countries all treated equally.

New!!: Economy and List of multilateral free-trade agreements · See more »

Lists of countries by GDP per capita

There are two articles listing countries according to their per capita GDP.

New!!: Economy and Lists of countries by GDP per capita · See more »

Low-carbon economy

A low-carbon economy (LCE), low-fossil-fuel economy (LFFE), or decarbonised economy is an economy based on low carbon power sources that therefore has a minimal output of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions into the biosphere, but specifically refers to the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.

New!!: Economy and Low-carbon economy · See more »

Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics (from the Greek prefix makro- meaning "large" and economics) is a branch of economics dealing with the performance, structure, behavior, and decision-making of an economy as a whole.

New!!: Economy and Macroeconomics · See more »

Maize

Maize (Zea mays subsp. mays, from maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago.

New!!: Economy and Maize · See more »

Management

Management (or managing) is the administration of an organization, whether it is a business, a not-for-profit organization, or government body.

New!!: Economy and Management · See more »

Manufacturing

Manufacturing is the production of merchandise for use or sale using labour and machines, tools, chemical and biological processing, or formulation.

New!!: Economy and Manufacturing · See more »

Marco Polo

Marco Polo (1254January 8–9, 1324) was an Italian merchant, explorer, and writer, born in the Republic of Venice.

New!!: Economy and Marco Polo · See more »

Market (economics)

A market is one of the many varieties of systems, institutions, procedures, social relations and infrastructures whereby parties engage in exchange.

New!!: Economy and Market (economics) · See more »

Market economy

A market economy is an economic system in which the decisions regarding investment, production, and distribution are guided by the price signals created by the forces of supply and demand.

New!!: Economy and Market economy · See more »

Mass production

Mass production, also known as flow production or continuous production, is the production of large amounts of standardized products, including and especially on assembly lines.

New!!: Economy and Mass production · See more »

Medium of exchange

A medium of exchange is a tradeable entity used to avoid the inconveniences of a pure barter system.

New!!: Economy and Medium of exchange · See more »

Mercantilism

Mercantilism is a national economic policy designed to maximize the trade of a nation and, historically, to maximize the accumulation of gold and silver (as well as crops).

New!!: Economy and Mercantilism · See more »

Merchant

A merchant is a person who trades in commodities produced by other people.

New!!: Economy and Merchant · See more »

Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia is a historical region in West Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran–Iraq borders.

New!!: Economy and Mesopotamia · See more »

Metric (mathematics)

In mathematics, a metric or distance function is a function that defines a distance between each pair of elements of a set.

New!!: Economy and Metric (mathematics) · See more »

Microeconomics

Microeconomics (from Greek prefix mikro- meaning "small") is a branch of economics that studies the behavior of individuals and firms in making decisions regarding the allocation of scarce resources and the interactions among these individuals and firms.

New!!: Economy and Microeconomics · See more »

Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

New!!: Economy and Middle Ages · See more »

Milton Friedman

Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American economist who received the 1976 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his research on consumption analysis, monetary history and theory, and the complexity of stabilization policy.

New!!: Economy and Milton Friedman · See more »

Mining

Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit.

New!!: Economy and Mining · See more »

Monoculture

Monoculture is the agricultural practice of producing or growing a single crop, plant, or livestock species, variety, or breed in a field or farming system at a time.

New!!: Economy and Monoculture · See more »

Nation state

A nation state (or nation-state), in the most specific sense, is a country where a distinct cultural or ethnic group (a "nation" or "people") inhabits a territory and have formed a state (often a sovereign state) that they predominantly govern.

New!!: Economy and Nation state · See more »

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism or neo-liberalism refers primarily to the 20th-century resurgence of 19th-century ideas associated with laissez-faire economic liberalism.

New!!: Economy and Neoliberalism · See more »

Netherlands

The Netherlands (Nederland), often referred to as Holland, is a country located mostly in Western Europe with a population of seventeen million.

New!!: Economy and Netherlands · See more »

New World

The New World is one of the names used for the majority of Earth's Western Hemisphere, specifically the Americas (including nearby islands such as those of the Caribbean and Bermuda).

New!!: Economy and New World · See more »

Nobility

Nobility is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary.

New!!: Economy and Nobility · See more »

North America

North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.

New!!: Economy and North America · See more »

Physiocracy

Physiocracy (from the Greek for "government of nature") is an economic theory developed by a group of 18th century Enlightenment French economists who believed that the wealth of nations was derived solely from the value of "land agriculture" or "land development" and that agricultural products should be highly priced.

New!!: Economy and Physiocracy · See more »

Planned economy

A planned economy is a type of economic system where investment and the allocation of capital goods take place according to economy-wide economic and production plans.

New!!: Economy and Planned economy · See more »

Portugal

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic (República Portuguesa),In recognized minority languages of Portugal: Portugal is the oldest state in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the oldest in Europe, its territory having been continuously settled, invaded and fought over since prehistoric times.

New!!: Economy and Portugal · See more »

Post-industrial society

In sociology, the post-industrial society is the stage of society's development when the service sector generates more wealth than the manufacturing sector of the economy.

New!!: Economy and Post-industrial society · See more »

Postmodernism

Postmodernism is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late-20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.

New!!: Economy and Postmodernism · See more »

Primary sector of the economy

An industry involved in the extraction and collection of natural resources, such as copper and timber, as well as by activities such as farming and fishing.

New!!: Economy and Primary sector of the economy · See more »

Private sector

The private sector is the part of the economy, sometimes referred to as the citizen sector, which is run by private individuals or groups, usually as a means of enterprise for profit, and is not controlled by the State.

New!!: Economy and Private sector · See more »

Product (business)

In marketing, a product is anything that can be offered to a market that might satisfy a want or need.

New!!: Economy and Product (business) · See more »

Production (economics)

Production is a process of combining various material inputs and immaterial inputs (plans, know-how) in order to make something for consumption (the output).

New!!: Economy and Production (economics) · See more »

Profession

A profession is a vocation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested objective counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain.

New!!: Economy and Profession · See more »

Protectionism

Protectionism is the economic policy of restricting imports from other countries through methods such as tariffs on imported goods, import quotas, and a variety of other government regulations.

New!!: Economy and Protectionism · See more »

Public interest

Public interest is "the welfare or well-being of the general public".

New!!: Economy and Public interest · See more »

Public sector

The public sector (also called the state sector) is the part of the economy composed of both public services and public enterprises.

New!!: Economy and Public sector · See more »

Quaternary sector of the economy

The quaternary sector of the economy is a way to describe a knowledge-based part of the economy, which typically includes services such as information technology, information-generation and -sharing, media, and research and development, as well as knowledge-based services like consultation, education, financial planning, blogging, and designing.

New!!: Economy and Quaternary sector of the economy · See more »

Raw material

A raw material, also known as a feedstock or most correctly unprocessed material, is a basic material that is used to produce goods, finished products, energy, or intermediate materials which are feedstock for future finished products.

New!!: Economy and Raw material · See more »

Real gross domestic product

Real Gross Domestic Product (real GDP) is a macroeconomic measure of the value of economic output adjusted for price changes (i.e., inflation or deflation).

New!!: Economy and Real gross domestic product · See more »

Real versus nominal value (economics)

In economics, a real value of a good or other entity has been adjusted for inflation, enabling comparison of quantities as if prices had not changed.

New!!: Economy and Real versus nominal value (economics) · See more »

Research

Research comprises "creative and systematic work undertaken to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of humans, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications." It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve new or existing problems, support theorems, or develop new theories.

New!!: Economy and Research · See more »

Revolutions of 1989

The Revolutions of 1989 formed part of a revolutionary wave in the late 1980s and early 1990s that resulted in the end of communist rule in Central and Eastern Europe and beyond.

New!!: Economy and Revolutions of 1989 · See more »

Saving

Saving is income not spent, or deferred consumption.

New!!: Economy and Saving · See more »

Scarcity

Scarcity refers to the limited availability of a commodity, which may be in demand in the market.

New!!: Economy and Scarcity · See more »

Secondary sector of the economy

The secondary sector of the economy includes industries that produce a finished, usable product or are involved in construction.

New!!: Economy and Secondary sector of the economy · See more »

Secretary of state

The title secretary of state or state secretary is commonly used for senior or mid-level posts in governments around the world.

New!!: Economy and Secretary of state · See more »

Secularization

Secularization (or secularisation) is the transformation of a society from close identification and affiliation with religious values and institutions toward nonreligious values and secular institutions.

New!!: Economy and Secularization · See more »

Service (economics)

In economics, a service is a transaction in which no physical goods are transferred from the seller to the buyer.

New!!: Economy and Service (economics) · See more »

Shekel

Shekel (Akkadian: šiqlu or siqlu; שקל,. shekels or sheqalim) is any of several ancient units of weight or of currency.

New!!: Economy and Shekel · See more »

Social group

In the social sciences, a social group has been defined as two or more people who interact with one another, share similar characteristics, and collectively have a sense of unity.

New!!: Economy and Social group · See more »

Social market economy

The social market economy (SOME; soziale Marktwirtschaft), also called Rhine capitalism, is a socioeconomic model combining a free market capitalist economic system alongside social policies which establish both fair competition within the market and a welfare state.

New!!: Economy and Social market economy · See more »

Social science

Social science is a major category of academic disciplines, concerned with society and the relationships among individuals within a society.

New!!: Economy and Social science · See more »

Socialism

Socialism is a range of economic and social systems characterised by social ownership and democratic control of the means of production as well as the political theories and movements associated with them.

New!!: Economy and Socialism · See more »

Sociology

Sociology is the scientific study of society, patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture.

New!!: Economy and Sociology · See more »

Spain

Spain (España), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Reino de España), is a sovereign state mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula in Europe.

New!!: Economy and Spain · See more »

Stock exchange

A stock exchange, securities exchange or bourse, is a facility where stock brokers and traders can buy and sell securities, such as shares of stock and bonds and other financial instruments.

New!!: Economy and Stock exchange · See more »

Stock market

A stock market, equity market or share market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers (a loose network of economic transactions, not a physical facility or discrete entity) of stocks (also called shares), which represent ownership claims on businesses; these may include securities listed on a public stock exchange as well as those only traded privately.

New!!: Economy and Stock market · See more »

Subsistence agriculture

Subsistence agriculture is a self-sufficiency farming system in which the farmers focus on growing enough food to feed themselves and their entire families.

New!!: Economy and Subsistence agriculture · See more »

Subsistence economy

A subsistence economy is a non-monetary economy which relies on natural resources to provide for basic needs, through hunting, gathering, and subsistence agriculture.

New!!: Economy and Subsistence economy · See more »

Sumer

SumerThe name is from Akkadian Šumeru; Sumerian en-ĝir15, approximately "land of the civilized kings" or "native land".

New!!: Economy and Sumer · See more »

Supply (economics)

In economics, supply is the amount of something that firms, consumers, labourers, providers of financial assets, or other economic agents are willing to provide to the marketplace.

New!!: Economy and Supply (economics) · See more »

Supply and demand

In microeconomics, supply and demand is an economic model of price determination in a market.

New!!: Economy and Supply and demand · See more »

Technology

Technology ("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia) is first robustly defined by Jacob Bigelow in 1829 as: "...principles, processes, and nomenclatures of the more conspicuous arts, particularly those which involve applications of science, and which may be considered useful, by promoting the benefit of society, together with the emolument of those who pursue them".

New!!: Economy and Technology · See more »

Tertiary sector of the economy

The tertiary sector or service sector is the third of the three economic sectors of the three-sector theory.

New!!: Economy and Tertiary sector of the economy · See more »

Textile

A textile is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread).

New!!: Economy and Textile · See more »

The Affluent Society

The Affluent Society is a 1958 (4th edition revised 1984) book by Harvard economist John Kenneth Galbraith.

New!!: Economy and The Affluent Society · See more »

The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics (2008), 2nd ed., is an eight-volume reference work on economics, edited by Steven N. Durlauf and Lawrence E. Blume and published by Palgrave Macmillan.

New!!: Economy and The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics · See more »

The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

New!!: Economy and The Wall Street Journal · See more »

Thermoeconomics

Thermoeconomics, also referred to as biophysical economics, is a school of heterodox economics that applies the laws of statistical mechanics to economic theory.

New!!: Economy and Thermoeconomics · See more »

Thomas Robert Malthus

Thomas Robert Malthus (13 February 1766 – 23 December 1834) was an English cleric and scholar, influential in the fields of political economy and demography.

New!!: Economy and Thomas Robert Malthus · See more »

Three-sector theory

The three-sector theory is an economic theory which divides economies into three sectors of activity: extraction of raw materials (primary), manufacturing (secondary), and services (tertiary).

New!!: Economy and Three-sector theory · See more »

Trade

Trade involves the transfer of goods or services from one person or entity to another, often in exchange for money.

New!!: Economy and Trade · See more »

Transport

Transport or transportation is the movement of humans, animals and goods from one location to another.

New!!: Economy and Transport · See more »

Unemployment

Unemployment is the situation of actively looking for employment but not being currently employed.

New!!: Economy and Unemployment · See more »

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

New!!: Economy and United Kingdom · See more »

Universal access to education

Universal access to education is the ability of all people to have equal opportunity in education, regardless of their social class, gender, ethnicity background or physical and mental disabilities.

New!!: Economy and Universal access to education · See more »

Value (economics)

Economic value is a measure of the benefit provided by a good or service to an economic agent.

New!!: Economy and Value (economics) · See more »

Vasco da Gama

Vasco da Gama, 1st Count of Vidigueira (c. 1460s – 24 December 1524), was a Portuguese explorer and the first European to reach India by sea.

New!!: Economy and Vasco da Gama · See more »

Venture capital

Venture capital (VC) is a type of private equity, a form of financing that is provided by firms or funds to small, early-stage, emerging firms that are deemed to have high growth potential, or which have demonstrated high growth (in terms of number of employees, annual revenue, or both).

New!!: Economy and Venture capital · See more »

Voluntary sector

The voluntary sector or community sector (also non-profit sector or not-for-profit sector) is the duty of social activity undertaken by organizations that are not-for-profit and non-governmental.

New!!: Economy and Voluntary sector · See more »

Wirtschaftswunder

The term Wirtschaftswunder ("economic miracle"), also known as The Miracle on the Rhine, describes the rapid reconstruction and development of the economies of West Germany and Austria after World War II (adopting an Ordoliberalism-based social market economy).

New!!: Economy and Wirtschaftswunder · See more »

Wood

Wood is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants.

New!!: Economy and Wood · See more »

World

The world is the planet Earth and all life upon it, including human civilization.

New!!: Economy and World · See more »

World economy

The world economy or global economy is the economy of the world, considered as the international exchange of goods and services that is expressed in monetary units of account (money).

New!!: Economy and World economy · See more »

World war

A world war, is a large-scale war involving many of the countries of the world or many of the most powerful and populous ones.

New!!: Economy and World war · See more »

Redirects here:

Ecomony, Economic, Economic affairs, Economies, Economy (activity), Minister of Economy, National economies, National economy, Oeconomy, Real economy.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »